Category Archives: AED Accessories

AED Batteries: Rechargeable vs. Non-rechargeable

Which AED Battery is Right For You?

AED Battery

When deciding which AED is right for you, there are plenty of important considerations ranging from weight to overall cost to ease of maintenance. Because the type of battery your AED requires has a direct impact on weight, cost, and maintenance, this week we’re devoting an entire post to the topic.

Not only will we cover the pros and cons of non-rechargeable AED batteries versus rechargeable batteries, but we’ll provide you with a complete product list detailing the type of battery that powers each device.

Pros and Cons of Non-Rechargeable AED Batteries

Pro: Extended Battery Life

Most non-rechargeable lithium AED batteries have a useful lifespan of four to five years, assuming the device remains in “standby” mode. When your device remains in “standby,” battery use is minimal. In fact, it’s only in use only when your AED performs automatic, routine self-tests.

Pro: Low Maintenance

Non-rechargeable batteries are extremely easy-to-use and require very little or no maintenance. Simply insert the battery or batteries into your AED and you’re good to go! Non-rechargeable AED batteries are good options for non-professional, low-use settings such as an office or residential environment.

Con: Cost

If your AED sees repeated use, and therefore experiences frequent battery drain, you may find that replacing non-rechargeable AED batteries can be costly. AEDs with non-rechargeable batteries are best-suited for rare to occasional use.

Con: Environmental Impact

Lithium batteries should be properly recycled to minimize environmental harm. First, refer to your AED user guide to determine what kind of AED battery your device uses. We encourage you to contact the manufacturer of your device to determine whether or not they have a recycling program. If you’re unable to recycle your AED battery through the manufacturer, contact your local recycling center for recommendations.

Rechargeable AED Batteries

Pro: Best Battery for Professional Rescuers

Although the initial cost of a rechargeable battery is comparable to non-rechargeable batteries, rechargeable AED batteries are most commonly used by professional rescuers. When an AED is in a high-use environment, battery drain can be significant. In this scenario, recharging is more practical, efficient, environmentally friendly, and cost-effective than replacing a non-rechargeable battery on a monthly basis!

Con: Limited Battery Lifespan

It’s not at all uncommon for rechargeable batteries to be replaced after two years. Your device will alert you when it’s time to replace the battery.

Con: Charging Time and AED Downtime

Charging time varies by manufacturer and may range from two to 10 hours. If your AED sees frequent use, we strongly urge you to consider investing in a backup battery so your AED is always rescue-ready.

Con: Maintenance and Additional Costs

Unlike non-rechargeable batteries, rechargeable batteries need to be recharged frequently. In many instances, batteries need to be recharged monthly. You’ll also need a manufacturer-specific charging station.

AED Battery Type By Manufacturer

Non-Rechargeable

ZOLL AED Plus

ZOLL AED Pro

Cardiac Science Powerheart G3 Pro

Cardiac Science Powerheart G3

Cardiac Science Powerheart G5

Physio-Control LIFEPAK 1000

Philips HeartStart OnSite

Philips HeartStart FR3

Philips HeartStart FRx

HeartSine Samaritan PAD 350

HeartSine Samaritan PAD 450

HeartSine Samaritan PAD 360

Defibtech Lifeline

Defibtech Lifeline View

Rechargeable

ZOLL AED Pro

Cardiac Science Powerheart G3 Pro

Physio-Control LIFEPAK CR Plus

Physio-Control LIFEPAK Express

Generally speaking, we recommend AEDs with rechargeable batteries for professional rescuers or when a device is likely to see frequent use, either in a rescue or monitoring situation. For non-medical or infrequent use, long-lasting non-rechargeable batteries are advised.

Why is the Chain of Survival So Important?

Understanding the 5 Links in the Chain of Survival Can Improve Outcomes for SCA Survivors

The Chain of Survival is a metaphorical depiction of a series of critical actions that rescuers (bystanders or paramedics) need to take to improve the likelihood of survival following a cardiac arrest. Why is it so important? Put simply, knowing and understanding the five key “links” in the chain can vastly reduce mortality rates.

A majority of SCA survivors receive immediate help from bystanders. In fact, the time between the onset of arrest symptoms and care determines the likelihood of survival. Whether you’re a trained medical professional or a layperson, understanding the Chain of Survival can make all the difference.

Need more compelling evidence? The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation reports that “If treatment is not provided within 10 minutes, the survival rate is close to zero. Because minutes count, the public plays a crucial role in saving lives threatened by SCA.”

According to the American Heart Association (AHA), the 5 links in the adult out-of-hospital Chain of Survival are:

  • Recognition of cardiac arrest and activation of the emergency response system
  • Early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with an emphasis on chest compressions
  • Rapid defibrillation
  • Basic and advanced emergency medical services
  • Advanced life support and post-cardiac arrest care

Early Recognition and Call for Emergency Assistance

The first link, early recognition of cardiac arrest and the prompt activation of the emergency response protocol, is absolutely essential. When an out-of-hospital cardiac emergency occurs, dial 911 immediately. If the incident should occur on a job site or in a professional setting, the internal alert system should also be triggered, which will improve the odds obtaining of skilled, on-site assistance and equipment as soon as possible.

If someone reports experiencing pain or discomfort in the chest, jaw, neck or back, lightheadedness, nausea, vomiting, shortness of breath, or discomfort in the arm or shoulder, call 911. If an individual is unresponsive and is not breathing, call 911.

If possible, send someone to retrieve the nearest automated external defibrillator (AED).

What’s the Difference Between a Heart Attack and Sudden Cardiac Arrest? Well, in short, a heart attack is caused by a blockage in a vein or artery and SCA is caused by an electrical malfunction in the heart. Cardiac arrest may be caused by a heart attack, SCA, drowning, electrocution, or an obstructed airway. To make matters even more confusing, symptoms of a heart attack may vary and can be different for men than for women.

Don’t hesitate to call 911! It’s always better to be safe than sorry.

Prompt CPR with Chest Compressions

The second link dictates that CPR should commence immediately after a cardiac arrest has occurred. If you do not know how to perform CPR, a 911 operator will talk you through the procedure. If you are not trained in CPR, use hands-only CPR by pushing hard and fast on the center of the chest at a rate of 100-120 compressions per minute. The compression depth for adults should be at least two inches and the chest should recoil completely between compressions.

Anyone can perform CPR, and if possible it should be done without interruption until skilled emergency medical responders arrive.

Remember, any assistance is better than no assistance at all.

Rapid Defibrillation

As soon as an AED becomes available, the rescuer should place the device next to the victim. Simply turn it on and follow the visual and audio prompts. If a shock is advised, stand clear and make sure no one is in contact with the patient, then administer the shock.

The Zoll AED Plus, for example, will inform the rescuer when they are or aren’t pushing hard or fast enough. It’ll even show you the depth of each compression in real time. The AED Plus offers support to help rescuers successfully complete the Chain of Survival.

Basic and Advanced Care

The fourth link, basic and advanced emergency medical services, refers to the rapid response of highly trained and equipped EMS personnel who can respond to the patient, administer medications, and offer advanced respiration procedures and interventions as needed. This step is often dependent upon the very first link in the chain: early recognition and call for emergency assistance!

Advanced Life Support and Post Cardiac Arrest Care

The fifth and final link, Advanced Life Support and Post Cardiac Arrest Care, is best left to medical professionals. It may involve a multidisciplinary care team composed of cardiologists, physical therapists, and dieticians.

Ready to learn CPR or First Aid? AED.com and Cardio Partners is a trusted nationwide CPR training center. We offer CPR, First Aid, AED, and bloodborne pathogen training courses in all 50 states in traditional classroom settings and in blended learning courses. To learn more about our courses or to schedule a training, call our team at 866-349-4362 or email Cardio Partners at customerservice@cardiopartners.com. We’d love to hear from you!

Gasping Can Indicate Survival After Cardiac Arrest

According to the AHA, more than 350,000 people experience a non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) every year, averaging to more than 1,000 victims each day*. Among those statistics, only about 10 percent of OHCA victims survive. To combat these odds, however, a quick response with an automatic external defibrillator (AED) and CPR can improve the survival rate of an individual. In addition to the efforts of a rescuer, a recent study suggests gasping for air before or during CPR in an OHCA victim can actually be an indicator of survival with “favorable” brain function.

Gasping, or agonal respiration, is an individual’s natural reflex to allow for oxygen and circulation during CPR. This is said to be a marker for brainstem activity.

Remember, if someone is unresponsive and not breathing OR not breathing normally, start CPR.

According to researcher Guillaume Debaty, MD, this is the first report of its kind to stress the connection of gasping as a predictive factor to long-term survival and favorable brain function. Of those survivors, 37 percent had irregular respiration during CPR. This indicator is seen as a positive, which further solidifies the need for chest compressions during an OHCA on a gasping victim.

Following this study, researchers are recommending an emphasis be placed on identifying abnormal pattern breathing as an early sign of cardiac arrest. One of the authors of the report said it is a person’s natural response “deserving attention.” With this recent information, there is new stress on incorporating the recognition of gasping into CPR training. Researchers highlight the importance of rescuers correctly associating gasping as an indicator of cardiac arrest, rather than normal breathing.

Another goal for attributing gasping to cardiac arrest and survival rates is to help improve the lack of reporting and tracking around the phenomena in order to inform future research.

Are you thinking about CPR training? We hope so. Cardio Partners is a nationwide training center offering traditional classroom courses through the American Red Cross and the American Heart Association. Schedule CPR training by emailing customerservice@cardiopartners.com or by learning more here.

 Source: http://www.cpr.heart.org/AHAECC/CPRAndECC/General/UCM_477263_Cardiac-Arrest-Statistics.jsp

Top 5 AED Questions Answered

AED Q&A with Maddie Reaves

Customer Service Lead, Maddie Reaves, answers the Top 5 Questions often asked by many of our customers.

Q1: What is the difference between automatic and semi-automatic AEDs?
A1: When a patient goes down, and the AED is hooked up to them via the electrodes, it is going to analyze their heart rhythm. If an automatic AED determines that the heart is in a shockable rhythm (such as ventricular fibrillation), it will automatically administer the shock to restore a normal rhythm. In the same situation, if the AED is a semi-automatic, it will prompt the rescuer to press the shock button in order to restore normal rhythm. Continue reading Top 5 AED Questions Answered

Is Your AED Being Mismanaged?

AED Program Management Blog Post

At least 1000 defibrillators in Ireland (10% of the country’s AEDs deployed in public places) urgently need to complete an important software update throughout hotels, sports venues and other businesses according to a recent article in the IrishTimes. The Health Products Regulatory Authority (HPRA) is urging all owners of automated external to defibrillators (AEDs) to check the status of every device to ensure readiness in case of emergency. Non-efficient AED maintenance in Ireland is likely to be similar in the United States as well.
Continue reading Is Your AED Being Mismanaged?

Is One Set of AED Electrodes Enough?

Keep Calm Spare Pads

 

Hopefully you will never have to use the AED in your facility, but if you do, be aware that the electrodes pads are a one-time use accessory and must be replaced immediately following a rescue. If another cardiac emergency strikes before replacement pads arrive, the AED unit will be useless without a spare set of pads. Continue reading Is One Set of AED Electrodes Enough?