Category Archives: AED Awareness

6 Shocking Statistics About Sudden Cardiac Arrest and AEDs

SCA and AEDs By the Numbers (And What We Can Do About It)

To kick off the National Sudden Cardiac Awareness month and to usher in October, we’re sharing a few spook-worthy statistics about SCA.

Shocking Stat #1: Each year, more than 356,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) occur in the United States.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest Awareness Month

Taken a step further, about 90% of the people who experience an OHCA will die. While these numbers are nothing short of staggering, The American Heart Association also notes that “CPR, especially if administered immediately after cardiac arrest, can double or triple a person’s chance of survival.”

What is CPR and how does it work? Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is an easy-to-learn lifesaving procedure undertaken by first responders or bystanders in an effort to maintain the flow of oxygen to and from the brain and other vital organs. Often, artificial respiration (mouth-to-mouth or bag-valve mask ventilation) accompany manual chest compressions; however, compression-only CPR is an increasingly accepted method as well.

Let’s make a dent in the statistics! Cardio Partners offers nationwide CPR training; contact us to learn more.

Shocking Stat #2: Among middle-aged adults treated for SCA, 50% had no symptoms before the onset of arrest.

Much like SCA survivor Rob Seymour (who we profiled back in March), 50% of people who experience cardiac arrest demonstrate no warning signs.

However, when we flip that stat on its head, a whopping 50% of the people who experience SCA do exhibit warning signs in the hours, days, and weeks prior to the event, and only 19% of the symptomatic patients called emergency medical services to report their symptoms (National Center for Biotechnology Information).

Be heart-aware and be on the lookout for symptoms such as:

  • Pain or discomfort in the chest.
  • Lightheadedness, nausea, or vomiting.
  • Jaw, neck, or back pain.
  • Discomfort or pain in the arm or shoulder.
  • Shortness of breath.

Want to dig a little deeper? Read our post, “What’s the Difference Between a Heart Attack and Sudden Cardiac Arrest?

Shocking Stat #3: 475,000 Americans die from a cardiac arrest every year and 17.5 million people across the globe die from cardiovascular disease each year.

These figures, courtesy of the American Heart Association and the World Heart Federation, demonstrate just how important it is to take care of your heart! Put yet another way, in the United States, SCA claims more lives than colorectal cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, influenza, pneumonia, auto accidents, HIV, firearms, and house fires combined.

Just last week, in celebration of World Heart Day, we shared a few of our favorite heart-healthy tips!

Shocking Stat #4: 10,000 SCAs occur in the workplace each year.

The Occupational Health and Safety Administration strongly encourages the placement of AEDs in the workplace, yet no federal regulations exist.

Take a look at this example, cited on OSHA’s website: “While standing on a fire escape during a building renovation, a 30-year-old construction worker was holding a metal pipe with both hands. The pipe contacted a high voltage line, and the worker instantly collapsed. About 4 minutes later, a rescue squad arrived and began CPR. Within six minutes the squad had defibrillated the worker. His heartbeat returned to normal and he was transported to a hospital. The worker regained consciousness and was discharged from the hospital within two weeks.”

What can you do to improve SCA survival rates among your employees? Implement an AED program in your workplace today! Affordable, recertified AEDs start at just $550 and implementing an emergency response plan is priceless. Ready to take the plunge? We’ll help you figure out which AED is right for you.

Shocking Stat #5: 68.5% of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur at home.

It should go without saying, but we’re going to go ahead and say it: saving a life is, without a doubt, the best reason for learning CPR. Because four out of five cardiac arrests occur at home, performing CPR promptly and investing in an AED for your home may save the life of someone you love.

And, in case you’re curious, 21% OHCAs occurred in public settings and 10.5% occurred in nursing homes.

Shocking Stat #6: 45% of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims survive when bystander CPR is administered.

See, it’s not all bad news! Not only that, but the American Heart Association recently published an article revealing that more people are stepping up to offer CPR when someone’s heart stops.

However, despite that fact that first responders are “intervening at higher levels,” survival rates remain higher for men than for women.

One of the researchers associated with the study, Dr. Carolina Malta Hansen, a researcher at Duke Clinical Research Institute, said that a number of factors might have contributed to the outcomes. “Compared to male victims of cardiac arrests, women are more likely to have cardiomyopathy, or disease of the heart muscle, and non-shockable rhythms that can’t be treated with defibrillation. Women who suffer cardiac arrests also tend to be older than men and live at home alone, with less chance of CPR being performed.”

In the article, Hansen goes on to note that there’s a great need to strengthen all the links in the chain of survival and that “the most important thing for the general public to know is that bystander intervention is paramount. You shouldn’t be afraid of doing something wrong, because anything is better than nothing: Stepping in and starting CPR and applying an AED before EMS arrives is the foundation for survival.”

For more information about purchasing a new or recertified AED for your home or workplace, or to schedule AED training or maintenance, visit AED.com or call Cardio Partners at 866-349-4362. We also welcome your emails, you can reach us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

California Enacts New AED Legislation

New Laws Mandate AEDs at Public Swimming Pools, Schools and More

Legislators across the country appear to have AEDs on their minds, and they continue to develop legislation to ensure that their constituents have access to life-saving technology in public places. In May, Tennessee enacted legislation requiring AEDs in schools and requiring teachers to have AED training. Late last month, California amended existing AED laws and joined Maryland, New Jersey, and Oregon in requiring AEDs at public swimming pools.

AEDs Required at California Swimming Pools

The law, which was signed into law by Governor Jerry Brown on September 6, 2018, is summarized in the official Legislative Counsel’s Digest as follows, “This bill would require those public swimming pools, as defined, that are required to provide lifeguard services and that charge a direct fee to additionally provide an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) during pool operations, as specified. Because the failure to comply with these provisions would be a crime, the bill would create a state-mandated local program. The bill would also require the State Department of Education, in consultation with the State Department of Public Health, to issue best practices guidelines related to pool safety at K–12 schools, as specified.”

Assembly Bill 2009 Requires AEDs at Interscholastic Athletic Programs

Joining 17 other states that have enacted some form of AED legislation pertaining to schools, California now requires school districts’ public and charter schools that offer interscholastic athletic programs to:

  • Put an emergency action plan in place addressing, among other things, sudden cardiac arrest emergencies.
  • Acquire at least one AED for each public or charter school in the district (effective July 1, 2019) to be available on campus.
  • Encourage that AEDs be made available for use within 3-5 minutes of sudden cardiac arrest.
  • Ensure AEDs are made available to athletic trainers and coaches and other authorized individuals at athletic programs, on-campus activities, and events.
  • Ensure AEDs are properly inspected and maintained.

Fatal Heart Attack on Metrolink Prompts Changes to AED Laws

In August 2017, a man collapsed and died on an LA-bound Metrolink train. According to the LA Times, passengers performed CPR and called 911, but without an AED on board, they were unable to provide additional assistance. By the time the train arrived at Union Station, more than 30 minutes after the passenger had collapsed, it was too late.

Senate Bill 502, enacted on September 20, now requires public entities operating certain commuter rail systems to have an AED on board each train on or before July  1, 2020. Training of employees on AED use is encouraged, but not required.

New Construction, Renovations, and Tenant-improved Buildings Now Need an AED

Existing California laws mandated the placement of AEDs in certain newly constructed buildings with an occupancy of more than 200. This new addendum now requires “…certain occupied structures that are not owned or operated by any local government entity and are constructed on or after January 1, 2017, to have an automated external defibrillator (AED) on the premises. This bill would apply the AED requirements to certain structures that are constructed prior to January 1, 2017, and subject to subsequent modifications, renovations, or tenant improvements, as specified.”

A Summary of California’s AED Statutes

  • Any person who, in good faith and not for compensation, renders emergency care or treatment by the use of an AED at the scene of an emergency is not liable for any civil damages resulting from any acts or omissions in rendering the emergency care.
  • AED registration is required.
  • AEDs should be maintained according to the manufacturer’s specifications.
  • AED should be tested at least biannually and after each use.
  • When an AED is placed in a building, the building owner shall, at least once a year, notify the tenants as to the location of the AED units and provide information to tenants about who they can contact if they want to voluntarily take AED or CPR training.
  • Instructions for AED use should be posted in 14 point type next to the device.
  • AEDs are required in health studios and fitness centers.
  • AEDs are required in assembly buildings with an occupancy of greater than 300; business buildings with an occupancy of 200 or more; educational buildings with an occupancy of 200 or more; factory buildings with an occupancy of 200 or more; institutional buildings with an occupancy of 200 or more; mercantile buildings with an occupancy of 200 or more; residential buildings with an occupancy of 200 or more, excluding single-family and multifamily dwelling units.
  • If the governing board of a school district or the governing body of a charter school requires a course in health education for graduation from high school, then instruction in performing compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) should be included in the course.
  • AEDs are required at public swimming pools.
  • Public and charter schools with interscholastic athletic programs must have AEDs.
  • Certain commuter trains must have AEDs (effective July 2020).

 

We’ll do our best to keep you up-to-date on the latest AED legislation. Subscribe to our blog for the latest AED news and updates. For more information about AED laws, call the team at Cardio Partners and AED.com at 866-349-4362 or email us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

Please note: The information included in this post and on our website is not intended as legal advice. As legislation changes often, this post may inadvertently contain inaccurate or incomplete information. We urge you to contact your state representative should you require more information about current AED laws in your state.

A Complete Guide to AED Manufacturers

Finding the Right AED Manufacturer for Your AED Program

ZOLL, Physio-Control, Cardiac Science, Philips, HeartSine, Defibtech

First, we’d like to congratulate you on your decision to equip your school, community organization, office, or home with an automated external defibrillator (AED). Modern AEDs are small, portable and user-friendly electronic devices that automatically diagnose and respond to life-threatening heart rhythms. However, there are a number of different devices on the market and finding the one that works best for your organization is critical.

On-site AEDs can dramatically improve survival odds by significantly reducing the time between cardiac arrest and treatment. AEDs are battery-operated, compact, light, and portable. Because safeguards are programmed into each unit, regardless of manufacturer, users never have to worry about shocking a victim who has a heartbeat.

Anyone can use an AED. In fact, most AEDs provide simple, easy-to-follow audio and visual instructions that untrained bystanders can quickly comprehend and apply. Some AEDs advise the user when to administer the shock, while other AEDs may automatically apply a shock if the heart is arrhythmic.

As you consider your options, we encourage you to read our post, Which AED is Right for You, and make a list of your needs and priorities. Then, carefully consider the following manufacturers to find the AED that best fits your organization’s needs. For more information on funding your program, refer to our Grant Guide.

ZOLL

We covered the History of Defibrillation, Defibrillators, and Portable AEDs back in July, but it’s worth noting that ZOLL was founded in 1980 by one of the early pioneers of external cardiac stimulation, Dr. Paul M. Zoll. Today, Zoll Medical Corporation develops and markets a wide array of medical devices and software solutions that help save lives.

The ZOLL AED Plus and the ZOLL AED Pro, with their vivid green cases, are hard to miss. The AED Plus is the only AED with Real CPR Help®️. This feature offers real-time CPR feedback to help rescuers perform high-quality CPR and to more effectively save lives. While only half of all sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) victims need defibrillation, all of them need effective CPR. Real CPR guides rescuers through CPR and even advises them to “push harder,” if necessary.

The ZOLL AED Pro is designed with professional rescuers in mind and supports Basic Life Support as well as Advanced Life Support Professional. The high-resolution LCD display allows responders to visualize the patient’s ECG while performing CPR.

Cardiac Science

Cardiac Science, headquartered in Wisconsin, designs, manufactures and markets Powerheart® AEDs. The Powerheart G3 comes with an impressive 7-year warranty and the Powerheart G5 is the first FDA-approved AED to include fully automatic shock delivery, dual-language (English/Spanish) functionality, and variable escalating energy options. The device’s easy, intuitive operation is perfect for first-time responders and seasoned professionals.

To use, simply open the AED lid to activate the device. The Cardiac Science RescueCoach guides users through a rescue. Easy-to-follow text prompts make the Powerheart® a strong choice for noisy environments and the device also meets rigorous military standards for shock and vibration testing. The Rescue Ready® technology self-checks the primary components daily, ensuring that your device is fully operational and rescue-ready.

Physio-Control

Founded in 1955 by Dr. Karl William Edmark, Physio-Control manufactures “emergency response tools of the highest quality to help clinicians and emergency responders, anywhere in the world, through the toughest kind of emergencies.”

Designed for heavy use, the LIFEPAK 1000 is rugged and durable. The device features built-in flexibility which allows users to program the device to change protocols as standards of care evolve.  It’s a great option for EMS professionals.

The LIFEPAK CR Plus is easy-to-use and is trusted by emergency medical professionals worldwide. The fully automatic LIFEPAK CR Plus offers an easy two-step operation, is water-resistant, and is very lightweight. The device automatically adjusts voltage based on individual needs, making it an ideal choice for high-traffic public areas.

Physio-Control also offers the LIFEPAK Express for budget-minded organizations. The device includes a quick-use instruction card and can deliver up to 360 joules of defibrillation energy, as needed.

HeartSine

The HeartSine Samaritan line of AEDs is designed for use in public areas. Offering the highest levels of dust and water protection in the industry. It is small, extremely compact, light and portable. In fact, it’s the lightest family of AEDs on the market. To simplify maintenance, HeartSine AEDs feature the innovative Pad-Pak™, which houses both the battery and electrodes with one, easy-to-track expiration date.

The HeartSine 450 is one of the few AEDs available to offer live feedback during CPR.

Philips

Philips, a company known for its wide-ranging medical technologies and innovative healthcare solutions, offers the HeartStart family of defibrillators. The Philips HeartStart FR3 AED is the lightest professional device available.

The HeartStart FRx AED is an excellent option for schools, pools, fitness centers, and outdoor venues. The device features fast shocking times and is durable and water-resistant. To transform the device from an adult-only AED to a pediatric AED, simply insert the infant/child key. One set of pads works for adults, children, and infants.

The company’s HeartStart Onsite AED is a solid, cost-effective option for individuals who are at a higher risk of SCA. In fact, it’s the only AED on the market that’s available for personal or home use without a physician’s prescription. Weighing in at just 3.3 lbs, it’s easy to transport. To activate voice instructions, simply open the device. The step-by-step instructions are clear and adaptable, making it easier for untrained bystanders to respond to an emergency situation.

Defibtech

Founded in 1999 by Philadelphia cardiothoracic surgeon Dr. Glenn W. Laub and his longtime engineer friend, Gintaras Vaisnys, Defibtech’s vision was to create one of the world’s best AEDs by offering the highest levels of quality and reliability at an accessible price point.

The large, high-resolution, full-color, interactive display screen makes the Lifeline VIEW an excellent option for untrained rescuers or within organizations serving deaf or hard-of-hearing populations. It works well in all lighting situations and adapts for child or adult use.

The Defibtech Lifeline is a fully-automatic AED that’s easy to activate and features loud and clear voice prompts. Its long battery life makes it the perfect option for organizations looking to keep maintenance to a minimum.

Cardio Partners Offers AED Program Consulting Services

We know there’s a lot to consider when purchasing an AED for your organization or place of business. At Cardio Partners, we’re happy to help you select the manufacturer and model of AED that’s best for you. We specialize in full-customizable solutions for AED sales, compliance management, CPR training, and maintenance services. For more information about purchasing a new or recertified AED or to schedule AED training or maintenance, contact Cardio Partners at 866-349-4362 or email us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

AED Batteries: Rechargeable vs. Non-rechargeable

Which AED Battery is Right For You?

AED Battery

When deciding which AED is right for you, there are plenty of important considerations ranging from weight to overall cost to ease of maintenance. Because the type of battery your AED requires has a direct impact on weight, cost, and maintenance, this week we’re devoting an entire post to the topic.

Not only will we cover the pros and cons of non-rechargeable AED batteries versus rechargeable batteries, but we’ll provide you with a complete product list detailing the type of battery that powers each device.

Pros and Cons of Non-Rechargeable AED Batteries

Pro: Extended Battery Life

Most non-rechargeable lithium AED batteries have a useful lifespan of four to five years, assuming the device remains in “standby” mode. When your device remains in “standby,” battery use is minimal. In fact, it’s only in use only when your AED performs automatic, routine self-tests.

Pro: Low Maintenance

Non-rechargeable batteries are extremely easy-to-use and require very little or no maintenance. Simply insert the battery or batteries into your AED and you’re good to go! Non-rechargeable AED batteries are good options for non-professional, low-use settings such as an office or residential environment.

Con: Cost

If your AED sees repeated use, and therefore experiences frequent battery drain, you may find that replacing non-rechargeable AED batteries can be costly. AEDs with non-rechargeable batteries are best-suited for rare to occasional use.

Con: Environmental Impact

Lithium batteries should be properly recycled to minimize environmental harm. First, refer to your AED user guide to determine what kind of AED battery your device uses. We encourage you to contact the manufacturer of your device to determine whether or not they have a recycling program. If you’re unable to recycle your AED battery through the manufacturer, contact your local recycling center for recommendations.

Rechargeable AED Batteries

Pro: Best Battery for Professional Rescuers

Although the initial cost of a rechargeable battery is comparable to non-rechargeable batteries, rechargeable AED batteries are most commonly used by professional rescuers. When an AED is in a high-use environment, battery drain can be significant. In this scenario, recharging is more practical, efficient, environmentally friendly, and cost-effective than replacing a non-rechargeable battery on a monthly basis!

Con: Limited Battery Lifespan

It’s not at all uncommon for rechargeable batteries to be replaced after two years. Your device will alert you when it’s time to replace the battery.

Con: Charging Time and AED Downtime

Charging time varies by manufacturer and may range from two to 10 hours. If your AED sees frequent use, we strongly urge you to consider investing in a backup battery so your AED is always rescue-ready.

Con: Maintenance and Additional Costs

Unlike non-rechargeable batteries, rechargeable batteries need to be recharged frequently. In many instances, batteries need to be recharged monthly. You’ll also need a manufacturer-specific charging station.

AED Battery Type By Manufacturer

Non-Rechargeable

ZOLL AED Plus

ZOLL AED Pro

Cardiac Science Powerheart G3 Pro

Cardiac Science Powerheart G3

Cardiac Science Powerheart G5

Physio-Control LIFEPAK 1000

Philips HeartStart OnSite

Philips HeartStart FR3

Philips HeartStart FRx

HeartSine Samaritan PAD 350

HeartSine Samaritan PAD 450

HeartSine Samaritan PAD 360

Defibtech Lifeline

Defibtech Lifeline View

Rechargeable

ZOLL AED Pro

Cardiac Science Powerheart G3 Pro

Physio-Control LIFEPAK CR Plus

Physio-Control LIFEPAK Express

Generally speaking, we recommend AEDs with rechargeable batteries for professional rescuers or when a device is likely to see frequent use, either in a rescue or monitoring situation. For non-medical or infrequent use, long-lasting non-rechargeable batteries are advised.

10 Reasons Why AED Drills Are Important in Schools

Discover why AED drills are important and learn how to run an effective drill.

AEDs can save lives, but only if educators and administrators are prepared to take action. Tornado, fire, lockdown, and even active shooter drills are the norm for most schools across the country, but when is the last time you scheduled a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA)/AED drill?

In this post, we’ll discuss the reasons why SCA/AED drills are important in schools and we’ll give you the tools you need to create an effective drill.

Why are AED Drills Important? SCA is Shockingly Common in Schools.

A couple of weeks ago, we covered the importance of AEDs in schools. However, if you’re a by-the-numbers kind of person, here are a few statistics about SCA in schools and in children under the age 18:

  1. In the United States, 1 in 25 schools experiences an SCA event each year.
  2. In 2017, 7,037 children died from cardiac arrest.
  3. Schools are community gathering places, and adults are even more likely to suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a school setting than young adults.
  4. The hospital survival rate of students who experience SCA in a school with an AED is approximately 70%.
  5. The hospital survival rate of students who experience SCA in a school without an AED is approximately 8%.
  6. Student-athletes are more than 2 times as likely to die from SCA than non-athletes.
  7. 66% of the deaths caused by SCA in children occur during regular exercise.
  8. SCA caused by commotio cordis is the most common cause of traumatic death in youth baseball.
  9. Survival decreases an astounding 10% every minute until a defibrillator shock is applied.
  10. SCA in young people can be caused by Long QT Syndrome, commotio cordis, or congenital heart disease.

Sources: American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, Resuscitation Journal, Close the Gap, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, National Institute of Health, C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital.

How to Run an Effective AED Drill: Create, Practice, and Review.

Developing and running effective AED drills are an essential part of your school’s emergency plan. Because the single most important contributing factor for survival of SCA is minimizing the time from collapse to defibrillation —  survival decreases an astounding 10% every minute until a shock is applied — knowing what to do and how to do it quickly may save a life of a student, parent, or school employee.

Regularly scheduled drills can test your team and your student body’s readiness and their ability to act quickly and to respond appropriately in the event of a cardiac emergency.

The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation’s publication Saving Lives in Schools and Sports recommends developing and conducting practice drills for your cardiac Emergency Action Plan (EAP); it’s the best way to make sure it works! Then, once you’ve executed your drill, be sure that you conduct a detailed post-drill review so you and your team can make changes based on real-life scenarios.

Planning Your AED Drill

Here’s a convenient checklist for your annual or semi-annual AED drill:

  • Inform your team that you’ll be conducting a drill in the next week or two so they have an opportunity to review your EAP.
  • Make sure your staff is trained in adult, child, and infant CPR.
  • Choose a scenario that fits your setting.
  • Designate an observer/proctor to administer the drill.
  • Develop a drill worksheet (this worksheet should include the scenario for the drill, the time the drill commenced, when the victim was found, time the rescuer called 911, when chest compressions started, when other bystanders arrived on the scene, when the AED arrived on the scene, when AED training pads were applied, and the names of each individual performing the actions).
  • You’ll need an appropriately-sized CPR Manikin, AED trainer, AED, and a timing device.

Day of AED Drill

On the day of your school’s AED drill, your designated observer will place the CPR manikin in an appropriate, visible location. As soon as the manikin has been observed and someone has activated the EAP, the observer should note the time and read the scenario to the responders.

As soon as the responders have obtained the AED from its usual location, the observer should hand the rescuers the AED trainer to continue the drill (if possible, ask an assistant to return the emergency-ready AED to its clearly marked and accessible location). Do not use your emergency-ready AED for the drill! During this time the observer will record times and responses. If possible, the observer should take a video recording of the drill for post-drill evaluation.

After Drill Review

First, congratulate your team on a job well done! Then give everyone some time to process and think about their part in the drill. After everyone has had a day to think about how things went, bring your staff members together for a detailed analysis of your AED drill. Ask your educators what they thought went well. If possible, review the video of the drill. Ask your observer to note what the rescuers did right and what they could have been done better. Consider which parts of the drill went smoothly and which parts were more challenging.

If you make changes to your emergency action plan, be sure to communicate those changes and schedule another drill for later in the school year!

For more information about AED packages for your school or AED and CPR training, call the team at Cardio Partners and AED.com at 866-349-4362 or email us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

The Importance of AEDs in Schools

10 Facts About Automated External Defibrillators in Schools

With students across the country settling in for another year of learning, now is the perfect time to discuss the importance of AEDs in schools. Last week we covered the differences in adult, child, and infant CPR as well as the pediatric chain of survival and this week we’ll cover some interesting facts and statistics about AEDs in schools.

Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) occurs when the heart stops beating suddenly and unexpectedly. Often, this is caused by ventricular fibrillation (VF). VF is an abnormality in the heart’s electrical system, and when this occurs blood stops pumping to the brain, heart, and the rest of your vital organs. Bystanders who promptly begin CPR and defibrillation can keep oxygenated blood flowing throughout the body and preserve life.

Although sudden cardiac death (SCD) is shocking and leaves its mark on survivors, regardless of the age of the victim, it’s particularly tragic when school-aged children are the victims of SCD. The scars left by SCD on families, schools, and communities can be profound. Here at Cardio Partners and AED.com, we’re doing our best to raise awareness about SCA and to advocate for AEDs in the home, on the job, and in our schools.

Thousands of Children Die From Cardiac Arrest Each Year

According to the American Heart Association’s latest figures, 7,037 children die from cardiac arrest each year. When you consider that most American children spend between 175 and 180 days in school each year and receive between 900 and 1,000 hours of instructional time per year (Center for Public Education) it’s critically important for our public schools to have AEDs readily available.

SCA is Shockingly Common

It’s hard to believe, but two in fifty high schools in the United States can expect an SCA event each year.

Most States Do Not Require AEDs in Public Schools

Although Tennessee, Cardio Partners’ home state, just joined the ranks of states that require AEDs in public high schools, fewer than 20 states have enacted legislation requiring AEDs in public schools. Just nine of those states provide funding for AEDs.

AEDs in Schools Dramatically Improve the Hospital Survival Rate

The hospital survival rate of students who suffer from cardiac arrest in a school with an AED is approximately 70%, compared with only approximately 8% in the overall population of school-age children (American College of Cardiology).

Young Athletes are More Likely to Experience Sudden Cardiac Death than Non-Athletes

In the United States, a young competitive athlete dies suddenly every three days. Young athletes are more than twice as likely to experience SCD than young non-athletes (Close the Gap). The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia found that two-thirds of the deaths caused by SCA in children occur during exercise or activity. In fact, SCA is the leading cause of death in young athletes.

Every Second Counts

The American College of Cardiology notes that, “The most important contributing factor for survival of sudden cardiac arrest is the time from collapse to defibrillation. Survival decreases 10% every minute until a shock is applied.”

Anyone Can Use an AED

Studies indicate that students without any prior CPR or AED training can accurately use an AED as directed. AEDs are, by design, easy to use. By following an AED’s simple, clear voice prompts, bystanders can perform the crucial steps that can save a life.

The Biggest Hurdle for Many Schools is Cost

Many companies, including Cardio Partners and AED.com, offer affordable AED packages to schools. These packages may include an AED, compliance management, a wall cabinet, AED pads, a rescue-ready kit, signage, and more. CPR and AED training courses are also available.

Finding the Best Location for Your AED is Important

Your school’s AED can’t save a life if no one can find it! Finding the best placement for your AED is crucial. Locating an AED in a highly visible and public location can mean the difference between life and death.

Good Samaritan Laws Protect Bystanders

You should never be afraid to lend assistance to someone experiencing SCA. Although not all states mandate the placement of AEDs in schools, all 50 states have enacted Good Samaritan laws to protect bystanders who use an AED to resuscitate a victim of SCA.

For more information about AED packages for your school or AED and CPR training, call the team at Cardio Partners and AED.com at 866-349-4362 or email us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

(Almost) Everything You Need to Know About CPR and AEDs

What is CPR? What Are AEDs? We Have the Answers!

Coming off the heels of a heart-pounding CPR and AED Awareness week, we realized that although we had a great time with our CPR Songs: Greatest Hits to Save Lives, it might be wise to share some general information about CPR and AEDs.

Because it’s impossible to teach you everything you need to know about CPR and AEDs in the space of a blog, we’re happy to share the top 10 things you need to know about the life-saving procedure and device. For everything you need to know, sign up for a CPR and AED training class today!

5 Things You Need to Know About CPR:

What is CPR?

CPR, or cardiopulmonary resuscitation, is an easy-to-learn first aid technique that can keep the victims of a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) or other medical emergency alive until medical professionals can take over.

What Does CPR Do?

CPR keeps blood pumping through the body, which helps maintain vital organ function. CPR has two primary goals: to keep oxygen flowing in and out of the lungs and to keep oxygenated blood flowing throughout the entire body.

Anyone Can Learn CPR

Although real-life doctors (and the actors who just play them on TV) perform CPR professionally, CPR training is easy and anyone can do it. With more than 350,000 cardiac arrests occurring each and every year, amateurs are welcome!

In many instances, “blended” courses allow busy folks to complete the text-based portion of the course online at their own pace and convenience. Once you’ve passed the online course, a focused 3-4 hour hands-on skills workshop rounds out the training. Wondering what you’ll learn in a CPR or First Aid class? Read our post on the subject!

CPR Can Be Tiring

Performing CPR can be physically demanding. High-performing CPR requires 100-120 deep and steady compressions per minute, so head to the gym and start working on your upper body strength and cardio! Take AED.com CPR playlist with you, while you’re at it! Should you be called upon to perform CPR in an emergency, you may find yourself getting tired, so if possible switch off with another person every couple of minutes.

Hands-Only CPR is Effective

Hands-only CPR (also known as compression-only CPR) is CPR without rescue breaths. The American Heart Association has noted that “Hands-only CPR carried out by a bystander has been shown to be as effective as CPR with breaths in the first few minutes during an out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest for an adult victim.”

5 Things You Need to Know About AEDs:

What is an AED?

An automated external defibrillator (AED) is a small, portable medical device. When its pads are attached to a person’s chest, the AED can analyze an individual’s heart rhythm and deliver a shock, if necessary, to restart his or her heart. Bystanders, as well as medical professionals, can use AEDs.

How Does an AED Work?

The device works by measuring an unresponsive person’s heart rhythm and delivering a shock to restart the heart or to shock the heart back into the correct rhythm. After analyzing the heart rhythm, automated voice instructions and text prompts tell the rescuer how to proceed. If defibrillation is necessary, the device will warn responders to stay clear of the victim while the shock is delivered. If CPR is indicated, the AED will instruct the rescuer to continue performing CPR.

When Do I Use an AED?

Sudden cardiac arrest can occur anytime, anywhere, and without warning. Call 911 and get the AED if someone becomes suddenly unresponsive, stops breathing, or does not respond when you tap or shake the shoulder firmly and ask, “Are you OK?”

Where Can I Find an AED?

Although laws for the placement of AEDs vary, many states require AEDs in public areas like gyms, schools, sports stadiums, and community centers. AEDs should be kept in a well-marked and publicly accessible location. If you don’t know where your office or workplace keeps the AED, find out! You never know when you might be called upon to use it.

If AEDs Are So Easy To Use, Why Do I Need Training?

Not only will training teach you how to respond quickly in the event of a cardiac emergency, but you’ll also learn how to activate the EMS system and act with confidence. Training also provides hands-on familiarity with an AED and teaches you how to avoid potentially dangerous situations.

For the full scoop on purchasing an AED, CPR and AED Training, and AED Compliance Management, download our free AED Starters Guide. Have questions? We’d love to chat! Call Cardio Partners at 866-349-4362. You can also email us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.