Category Archives: AED Legislation

California Enacts New AED Legislation

New Laws Mandate AEDs at Public Swimming Pools, Schools and More

Legislators across the country appear to have AEDs on their minds, and they continue to develop legislation to ensure that their constituents have access to life-saving technology in public places. In May, Tennessee enacted legislation requiring AEDs in schools and requiring teachers to have AED training. Late last month, California amended existing AED laws and joined Maryland, New Jersey, and Oregon in requiring AEDs at public swimming pools.

AEDs Required at California Swimming Pools

The law, which was signed into law by Governor Jerry Brown on September 6, 2018, is summarized in the official Legislative Counsel’s Digest as follows, “This bill would require those public swimming pools, as defined, that are required to provide lifeguard services and that charge a direct fee to additionally provide an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) during pool operations, as specified. Because the failure to comply with these provisions would be a crime, the bill would create a state-mandated local program. The bill would also require the State Department of Education, in consultation with the State Department of Public Health, to issue best practices guidelines related to pool safety at K–12 schools, as specified.”

Assembly Bill 2009 Requires AEDs at Interscholastic Athletic Programs

Joining 17 other states that have enacted some form of AED legislation pertaining to schools, California now requires school districts’ public and charter schools that offer interscholastic athletic programs to:

  • Put an emergency action plan in place addressing, among other things, sudden cardiac arrest emergencies.
  • Acquire at least one AED for each public or charter school in the district (effective July 1, 2019) to be available on campus.
  • Encourage that AEDs be made available for use within 3-5 minutes of sudden cardiac arrest.
  • Ensure AEDs are made available to athletic trainers and coaches and other authorized individuals at athletic programs, on-campus activities, and events.
  • Ensure AEDs are properly inspected and maintained.

Fatal Heart Attack on Metrolink Prompts Changes to AED Laws

In August 2017, a man collapsed and died on an LA-bound Metrolink train. According to the LA Times, passengers performed CPR and called 911, but without an AED on board, they were unable to provide additional assistance. By the time the train arrived at Union Station, more than 30 minutes after the passenger had collapsed, it was too late.

Senate Bill 502, enacted on September 20, now requires public entities operating certain commuter rail systems to have an AED on board each train on or before July  1, 2020. Training of employees on AED use is encouraged, but not required.

New Construction, Renovations, and Tenant-improved Buildings Now Need an AED

Existing California laws mandated the placement of AEDs in certain newly constructed buildings with an occupancy of more than 200. This new addendum now requires “…certain occupied structures that are not owned or operated by any local government entity and are constructed on or after January 1, 2017, to have an automated external defibrillator (AED) on the premises. This bill would apply the AED requirements to certain structures that are constructed prior to January 1, 2017, and subject to subsequent modifications, renovations, or tenant improvements, as specified.”

A Summary of California’s AED Statutes

  • Any person who, in good faith and not for compensation, renders emergency care or treatment by the use of an AED at the scene of an emergency is not liable for any civil damages resulting from any acts or omissions in rendering the emergency care.
  • AED registration is required.
  • AEDs should be maintained according to the manufacturer’s specifications.
  • AED should be tested at least biannually and after each use.
  • When an AED is placed in a building, the building owner shall, at least once a year, notify the tenants as to the location of the AED units and provide information to tenants about who they can contact if they want to voluntarily take AED or CPR training.
  • Instructions for AED use should be posted in 14 point type next to the device.
  • AEDs are required in health studios and fitness centers.
  • AEDs are required in assembly buildings with an occupancy of greater than 300; business buildings with an occupancy of 200 or more; educational buildings with an occupancy of 200 or more; factory buildings with an occupancy of 200 or more; institutional buildings with an occupancy of 200 or more; mercantile buildings with an occupancy of 200 or more; residential buildings with an occupancy of 200 or more, excluding single-family and multifamily dwelling units.
  • If the governing board of a school district or the governing body of a charter school requires a course in health education for graduation from high school, then instruction in performing compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) should be included in the course.
  • AEDs are required at public swimming pools.
  • Public and charter schools with interscholastic athletic programs must have AEDs.
  • Certain commuter trains must have AEDs (effective July 2020).

 

We’ll do our best to keep you up-to-date on the latest AED legislation. Subscribe to our blog for the latest AED news and updates. For more information about AED laws, call the team at Cardio Partners and AED.com at 866-349-4362 or email us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

Please note: The information included in this post and on our website is not intended as legal advice. As legislation changes often, this post may inadvertently contain inaccurate or incomplete information. We urge you to contact your state representative should you require more information about current AED laws in your state.

TN Lawmakers Pass AED Legislation

New Tennessee Law Requires AEDs and AED Training for School Personnel

Tennessee state lawmakers recently passed legislation that requires automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in all public high schools. It also encourages districts to equip middle and elementary schools with them as well. The new legislation, which is currently awaiting Governor Haslam’s signature, also provides funding for public high schools that are unable to afford the devices.

The bill was backed by Rhonda Harrill, an East Tennessee mother who lost her son in 2009 to cardiac arrhythmia. According to a segment that aired on Blount County’s 10News in 2016, Tanner, her athletic and active son, had told his basketball coach that he wasn’t feeling well and took a seat on the bench. Just moments later the 13-year-old suffered a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and collapsed.

Although Tanner’s coach immediately began CPR and a bystander quickly called 911, the young athlete was pronounced dead less than an hour after his collapse. Later, an autopsy revealed that he suffered from a condition called Long-QT syndrome, which can cause fast and chaotic heartbeats, fainting, seizures, and as in Tanner’s case, sudden death.

In the nine years that have passed since her son’s death, Tanner’s mother has been advocating for AED legislation. Last month, Knox News reported that Harrill “First fought for a bill to require AED placement in schools across the state, then for training and AED drills to keep teachers and older high school students trained up on the lifesaving devices. The new bill, which still needs to be signed by the governor to become law, provides funding for schools who cannot afford AEDs to purchase them.”

Many companies, including Cardio Partners and AED.com, offer affordable AED packages for schools, helping ensure that students, teachers, and community members are protected. These packages may include an AED, compliance management, a wall cabinet, AED pads, a rescue-ready kit, signage, and more. CPR and AED training courses are also available.

Why AEDs Are Important

Harrill believes an AED could have saved her son’s life.

“[I] had heard of AEDs, didn’t know if the school had one,” she said in the interview with 10News. “They did, but it was locked up in the office, and it was behind a mailbox where teachers get their mail. You would have never known it was there.”

Tennessee’s new law marks a huge step forward in school heart safety. The American Heart Association reports that 350,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur in the United States each year! Tragically, more than 7,000 youth under the age of 18 experience SCA annually (Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation). AEDs in schools can help save lives by restoring normal heart rhythms in individuals who have suffered a cardiac arrest.

While these automated devices are easy to use, annual AED training can increase user confidence and efficiency.

Furthermore, finding the best location for AED placement is critically important. Placing an AED in a highly visible and public location can mean the difference between life and death. Although Tanner’s school had an AED, it wasn’t located in the gym, where the likelihood of SCA is the highest. Not only that, but the device wasn’t even accessible to the general public.

When this bill is signed by Governor Haslam, Tennessee will join a growing number of states that have passed legislation that requires or recommends AEDs in schools. For more information about AED legislation, we encourage you to read our recent post, An Overview of State AED Laws and Recommendations.

For more information about AED packages for your school or AED and CPR training, call the team at Cardio Partners and AED.com at 866-349-4362 or email us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

AED Compliance Management

AED Compliance Management

Last week, we discussed the importance of having an AED in the workplace. This week, we’re taking a look at why it’s important to make sure your equipment is in compliance. At Cardio Partners, we’re committed to making sure that your workplace is both well-prepared and well-protected in the event of a medical emergency. In addition to our CPR and first aid training courses, AED sales and maintenance, and our comprehensive consultation services, our user-friendly online AED compliance management system helps ensure that your AED is both in compliance with local laws and is emergency-ready.

Why is AED Compliance Important?

Each year, more than 350,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur in the United States. Sudden cardiac arrest — an electrical malfunction in the heart that disrupts the flow of oxygenated blood to the brain and other vital organs — is a leading cause of death among Americans (American Heart Association). While these startling statistics make a strong case for the importance of CPR training and certification, they also shed light on the significance of properly maintained AEDs and investing in a full-service AED Compliance Management System for your workplace.

Out-of-compliance AEDs not only cost lives, but they result in heartbreakingly tragic and unnecessary lawsuits. Keep your AEDs in good working order with a reliable Compliance Management System. AED Compliance Management Systems are the easiest and safest way to make sure that your equipment is up-to-date and are ready to save lives. You can also dramatically reduce your legal liability by investing in a compliance system.

What Should Be Included in an AED Compliance Management System?

Whether you have a single AED or dozens, a user-friendly online AED compliance management system can help reduce your liability. Look for a system that includes the following features:

AED Registration

A full-service AED Compliance Management System makes it easy to register and track your life-saving devices. Make sure your team and your clients are well protected by keeping all pertinent information and instructions about your AEDs in an easily accessible place: at your fingertips.

Monthly AED Check Reminders

We understand that business owners, facilities managers, school administrators, executive directors, and medical personnel are busy. With so much on your plate, it’s easy to overlook AED maintenance checks. With Cardio Partners’ online AED Compliance Management System, however, you’ll never forget another check-in. Our system sends an email reminder every 30 days so you can enjoy peace of mind while keeping your focus on your business.

AED Check Logging

Many states require monthly inspections of AEDs. Online systems ensure that your equipment remains in compliance year-round.

AED Unit Readiness and Expiration Tracking

Even with monthly reminders, checks, and routine preventative maintenance, AEDs expire. Compliance Management Systems help keep you up-to-date and your equipment in good working order.

24-Hour AED Use Helpline

Whether you’re training new employees, have a general question about how to use your equipment, or need immediate assistance, full-service AED compliance management systems offer online chat, phone, email, and help desk support.

Resource Library Access

Laws regarding AEDs vary by state. We understand that finding the right information can be overwhelming! With an AED Compliance Management System from Cardio Partners, you’ll gain access to a comprehensive online library of legal, statutory, and regulatory requirements.

Medical Direction

Rest assured knowing that a physician medical director is assigned to provide, review, and approve current rescue protocols.

AED Prescription Maintenance

AEDs are manufactured and sold under guidelines approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA may require someone who purchases an AED to present a physician’s prescription for the device (American Heart Association). Compliance management systems help users maintain current prescriptions for their onsite AEDs.

AED Oversight

Leave compliance to the compliance professionals with a turn-key management system.

Courtesy Overdue Calls

If your inbox is overwhelmed and you missed our monthly email notifications, you’ll receive a courtesy call from our team 45 and 60 days after an overdue inspection. Don’t worry, we have you and your team covered.

Leave your AED compliance management to us. For more information about AED Compliance Management Systems, contact Cardio Partners at 866-349-4362 or email us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

Commotio Cordis: Secret Killer in Young Athletes

Safety always comes before the game, especially when young people are involved. With sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) being the number one cause of death among student athletes, parents and coaches must be prepared for such an unimaginable event. Often times, SCA occurs in student athletes for one of these three reasons: A blow to the chest (Commotio Cordis); structural heart defects (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, Marfan syndrome, etc.); or electrical heart defects (long QT syndrome, Wolff-Parkinson White Syndromes, etc.).

Commotio Cordis is Latin for “agitation of the heart,” which occurs when there is a blow to the chest between heartbeats. This can trigger a SCA. According to a report by the UT Southwestern Medical Center, many of these incidents take place when youths are playing baseball, where the ball has the ability to travel at very high speeds. For example, when a student athlete is struck in the chest with a baseball, the heart will go into ventricular fibrillation. This means the heart will begin an uncoordinated quivering, and unless an external automatic defibrillator (AED) is present to shock the heart back into its appropriate rhythm, it will eventually stop.

Though Commotio Cordis is considered a rare event, is still the second most common cause of sudden death among athletes. It is most common in teenage boys, usually dropping off around the age of 20. The age factor —according to the UT report — could be related to the strengthening of the chest wall and a decline in playing sports after high school. Regardless, coaches and parents should learn to recognize the signs of Commotio Cordis in order to ensure the right precautions are taken for the safety of these athletes.

Be AED and CPR ready should you notice any of the below risk factors in a young athlete, especially if it follows trauma to the chest:

  • Fainting or seizures during or after exercising
  • Any indication of chest pains
  • Unexplained shortness of breath or long time to catch breath

http://www.aed.com/aed-packages-page/athletic-aed-packages.html

 

Public Access Rescue Ready AEDs

It’s happened! Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) just struck in the person next to you, and they are in dire need of an automatic external defibrillator (AED). Luckily, you know where the AED is located, and it also has the ability to walk you through CPR. But as you grab this lifesaving device, the unthinkable happens — or rather, it doesn’t. The AED isn’t rescue ready. The device hasn’t been checked for preventative maintenance in years.

According to a study by UofL researchers, 21 percent of 322 AEDs at 190 public, non-hospital settings failed at least one phase of testing. Of that number, five percent had expired batteries, which would not allow them to work in a time of need.

Unfortunately, there are no required standards for the maintenance of AEDs or its registration. This makes the upkeep entirely voluntary for the AED carrier. Initially, the AED is registered with the vendor in order for the purchaser to receive updates on any recalls and advisories.

Cardio Partners offers preventative maintenance services to ensure your device is rescue ready. This helps to cut on costs of any unnecessary repairs or startling discoveries should it not work in a time of need. Preventative maintenance can help to guarantee a long lifetime for your piece of equipment; so that you can rest assured that is going to be ready in a time of need.

Why We Need AEDs in Schools

 

With school back in full swing again, teachers, coaches and other faculty members must strive to create a safe environment for every child that walks through their doors. Having that responsibility is big, but creating a little piece of mind by implementing automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in schools is even bigger. When we lose nearly 7,000 young people to sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) each year, it’s hard not to concern ourselves with the best way to respond should it strike during school hours. Not every school can afford to have emergency personnel on the premises, so having a life-saving source is key — especially when the AED is designed to walk any rescuer through defibrillation and CPR using voice prompts.

 

Despite the fact SCA can strike at any time in people of all ages and fitness levels, only 17 out of 50 states in the U.S. are required to install AEDs in schools, says an analysis published in the Journal of the American College Cardiology. This seems like an impossible number of states without the requirement for AEDs in schools, especially considering that defibrillation within three minutes of SCA can increase a person’s survival to 70 percent.

 

Often times, SCA occurs in young persons between the ages 10-19 years old; however, it can still strike in children of all ages without warning. According to the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, two-thirds of SCA-related deaths in children happen during exercise or activity. With this in mind, preparation for such a tragic event can start with simple CPR, AED and first training.

 

Knowing that AEDs are crucial to increasing someone’s survival rate, there’s no question as to why they’re needed in schools. So, before investing in an AED at your facility, you first want to be sure it’s affordable, reliable and, most importantly, easy to use. Fortunately, models like the Zoll AED Plus and the HeartSine Samaritan PAD 350P can offer a solution. Both of these affordable, lifesaving devices use voice prompts, which helps guide any rescuer through the resuscitation process. This allows the user to feel confident in their rescuing abilities during a very high stress situation.

Regional Efforts for AED Placement

AED Placement

According to Live 5 News out of Charleston, SC, emergency responders have been mapping out the placement of AED’s in the Lowcountry for a couple of years now. EMS Chief Carl Fehr says they created an AED database to make it easier when someone calls 911. Dispatchers will talk lay responders through the process of doing CPR and also let them know where they can find an AED.

Over 500 devices have been registered. however, they believe there are several that still need to be accounted for in the community. Businesses have access to register their AEDs in a database so when someone calls from that location, the dispatcher can see where the AED is placed within the building.

Back in December of 2016, Tony Butler and his teammates were playing basketball at the Mt. Pleasant town hall gym. Butler’s medical checkups have always been good, his blood pressure normal. Yet, as he puts it, “it happened.”

Butler had just wrapped up one game, and the guys playing the next court over convinced him to stay and join in.

“I was there about 5 minutes and didn’t feel right,” said Butler. “So I went and sat on the bench. And they tell me I slid onto the floor and was… was gone.”

His heart stopped. One player called 911. Someone else ran to the police station next door.

“And one of them went to the office and got the AED,” said Butler. Luckily, firefighters were at the gym by that point and could use the AED quickly. “They zapped me two or three times. The next thing I remember is being in the ambulance. Going across the bridge.”

Butler survived. He is still sore from his ribs being broken during chest compressions. He’s working on building up his basketball stamina again.

The goal is for people who witness a cardiac emergency to think not only to call 911, but to also think to grab an AED. While training helps with a rescuer’s comfort level, you don’t have to be trained.

Anyone can use an AED.

You do have to know where it is, which is why the regional registration database is so useful for someone calling 911.

“I think every business should have one,” Butler said about AEDs.

Source: live5news.com