Category Archives: AED

CPR Songs: Greatest Hits to Save Lives

Cardio Partners Salutes CPR and AED Awareness Week With CPR Playlist

Happy CPR and AED Awareness week! Here at Cardio Partners, we’re supporting and promoting this important week with a curated Spotify playlist just for you! All of the songs on our Greatest Hits to Save Lives have a lifesaving tempo of 100 to 120 beats per minute, which is perfect for performing chest compressions during CPR. From Queen Bey to Queen, our playlist has a little something for everyone.

5 Fast Facts About Sudden Cardiac Arrest and CPR

Before we dive into some fun musical trivia, here are a few facts about sudden cardiac arrest (SCA).

Fact 1: You Nearly Gave Me a Heart Attack Isn’t Accurate

Did you know that cardiac arrest and heart attacks aren’t the same thing? SCA occurs when an electrical malfunction in the heart causes an arrhythmia (abnormal heartbeat) and disrupts the flow of blood to the brain and other vital organs. A heart attack occurs when a blockage in an artery prevents the flow of blood to your heart.

So the next time your troublemaking teen sneaks up on you and scares you half to death, instead of “You nearly gave me a heart attack!” try out “I nearly had a cardiac arrest, kid!”

Fact 2: It Takes Less Than a Minute to Learn How to Save a Life

While it takes more than a decade to become a doctor, did you know that compression-only or hands-only CPR takes just a minute to learn and just may save someone’s life? Check out NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital’s simple 30-second, three-step video:

  • Step 1: Check the Victim

Check to see if the victim is responsive but tapping firming on his shoulders and checking for signs of breathing. If you don’t see any indications of life, get moving!

  • Step 2: Call 911

Call 911 immediately.

  • Step 3: Compress

Begin chest compressions. Interlock your fingers and use the heel of your palm to press down on the center of the center of the chest at a rate of two compressions per second.

Fact 3: Sudden Cardiac Arrest is a Leading Cause of Death

Unless you live in Montana, the odds of getting hit by lightning are just about one in a million. Between 2001 and 2010, an average of 280 lightning deaths and injuries were reported each year. Yet the moment we see a flash of lightning we know what to do: we wisely run for cover!

In stark contrast, there are more than 350,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests each year and 90% of these are fatal. Only 46% of the people who suffer an out-of-hospital SCA receive the immediate help they need before EMS teams arrive on the scene. Would you know what to do? If not, learn CPR!

Fact 4: You Can Change the Statistics

While it’s demoralizing to learn that 90% of the people who suffer from an SCA die and 70% of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur in the home, it doesn’t help anyone to be fatalistic about it. Change the statistics! Learn CPR.

According to the American Heart Association, CPR (especially if performed immediately) can double or even triple a person’s chance for survival.

Fact 5: Our “Greatest Hits to Save Lives” Playlist is Great for the Gym

Look, we really, really hope that you’re not the kind of person who’s going to cue up our playlist before starting CPR on someone. That would be bad. So plug those earbuds in, start your warmup, and get your Body Movin’.

A Few Fun Facts About Our CPR Playlist

Fact 1: “Cecilia,” By Simon and Garfunkel, Was Banned in Malawi

Apparently, the Malawi Censorship Board wasn’t too pleased the song’s titular heroine, whose name was the same as President Banda’s “Official Hostess” (FileRoom).

Fact 2: “Girls Just Wanna’ Have Fun” Was First Recorded by a Man

Believe it or not, Cyndi Lauper’s 1983 breakthrough hit was written and first recorded by Robert Hazard in 1979 (Wikipedia).

Fact 3: “Crazy in Love” is Bey and Jay’s Only Chart-Topping Collaboration

While they may seemingly rule the universe, “Crazy in Love” is the power couple’s only #1 hit single (Forbes).

Cardio Partners Donates AED Trainer to Local YMCA

YMCA of Middle Tennessee Gratefully Accepts New ZOLL AED Trainer from Cardio Partners

Long-time advocates for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) awareness, AED placement and training, and CPR certification, Cardio Partners recently donated a ZOLL AED PLUS Trainer to the YMCA of Middle Tennessee. The organization will use the new training device during the hands-on portion of CPR/First Aid training at the Margaret Maddox Family YMCA.

“We want to make sure that the people who are getting certified are being taught with the latest training devices. It’s important to be able to hear the voice prompts because in a real rescue operation you want to make sure that you understand what the device is telling you to do,” said Cardio Partners Marketing Coordinator Sonia Thalman.

Cardio Partners receives several donation requests each month, and the company’s leadership committee considers each request carefully and makes a decision based on a variety of factors.

“We felt like donating to the YMCA of Middle Tennessee was an especially good fit, as Cardio Partners is also headquartered in Nashville. We are committed to heart health and it’s nice to be able to serve our community,” said Sonia.

What is an AED Trainer?

An AED trainer is a non-shocking device that helps instructors safely train students on the correct use of an AED in a variety of life-threatening emergency situations. Typically, these devices come with reusable, low-adhesive defibrillator pads for adults and children.

Unlike rescue AEDs, which deliver therapeutic shocks, AED trainers do not. To avoid a potentially fatal mistake and to minimize liability, do not store AED trainers or AED Training pads near your rescue-ready AED. AED trainers should be used by qualified instructors and their students.

The ZOLL AED Plus Trainer 2 allows trainers like Michelle Mattox, CPR/AED/First Aid/O2 Instructor at the Margaret Maddox Family YMCA, to instruct a group of students on how to use an AED. The device features four pre-programmed rescue scenarios as well as a fully manual mode so that instructors can have full control over simulated emergencies. These devices help students practice CPR and defibrillation in real-life situations. After training, students should be able to successfully simulate rescuing the victim of cardiac arrest with the training AED. They should also understand the difference between a trainer and a rescue AED and the basic functions of a rescue AED.

Each year, Michelle certifies approximately 200 YMCA employees and community members. At a recent Saturday CPR/First Aid training, Michelle apologized for the state of her much-used device. The decade-old training unit had become little more than a prop, as the unit no longer gave audible prompts for users, nor could Michelle use the unit to simulate different rescue scenarios.

“This is a problem,” said Michelle in a recent phone conversation “because you need to know what to expect in the real world. If you can’t hear the trainer AED, it makes teaching much more difficult. It’s also harder for students to feel confident about their ability to use an AED. I’m just so excited to have the new unit! It’s loud — and it’s supposed to be loud! It’s going to make the training more realistic. I’m so grateful!”

Features of the ZOLL AED PLUS Trainer

The latest ZOLL Trainer includes controls that simulate voice and text prompts issued by the ZOLL AED Plus when when rescuers perform CPR. The trainer also features a metronome to to help students maintain a steady compression rhythm. Instructors can press the “push harder” button from a handheld remote when a student’s chest compressions are too shallow. Instructors can also select the “good compressions” button to provide positive feedback.

The trainer is programmed with four scenarios, each simulating a different heart rhythm. Instructors can also opt to use the manual function to customize scenarios.

To learn more about AED training devices or to submit a donation request, contact Cardio Partners or AED.com at 866-349-4362 or send an email to customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

What Will I Learn From a CPR or First Aid Class?

What to Expect from Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and First Aid Certification Courses

In this post we’ll preview some of the topics commonly covered, so you’ll know what to look forward to when you take the CPR/First Aid plunge. Depending on the course you take, you’ll learn CPR skills (which covers CPR for all ages, AED & choking), CPR for adults, and/or CPR for children. First Aid covers common scenarios including: bleeding, burns, poisoning, shock, and respiratory emergencies.

We’ll break it down for you in more detail, but in a nutshell, you’ll leave your CPR and First Aid classes with the knowledge, skills, experience, and confidence you need to help save a life.

Knowledge: What You Need to Know About CPR and First Aid

Today, many courses are “blended,” which means a substantial portion of the instruction occurs online. However, traditional, instructor-led training which allows participants to complete the coursework in one setting may is also available for large groups or corporate settings. Either way, once you’ve completed the required lessons and passed the accompanying skills, you’ll complete your certification with hands-on, in-person training.

Topics include how to identify sudden cardiac arrest, understanding the links in the chain of survival; the qualities of high performance CPR; the importance of personal safety and standard precautions; the steps to assess an unresponsive person; how to use an AED on an adult, child, or infant; how to place an unresponsive but breathing person in the recovery position; and how to recognize and provide treatment for a choking adult, child, or infant.  

As part of your First Aid Certification, you’ll first learn what your role as a provider is. As with CPR training, you’ll also learn how to recognize an emergency, why it’s important to offer to help, how to move an injured person safely and effectively, and the importance of standard precautions and protective barriers. You’ll also learn how to conduct primary assessments on responsive and unresponsive individuals which will, in turn, help you determine the best form of treatment.  

Skills: What You Need to Do as a CPR or First Aid Provider

Once you’ve acquired some basic CPR and First Aid knowledge, you’ll dive into the specific skills needed to perform both CPR and First Aid.

You’ll learn to perform one-person CPR, CPR with rescue breaths, Hands Only CPR, how to administer CPR as part of a 2 rescuer team, and how to administer a shock from an AED. You’ll also learn how to perform CPR on adults, children, and infants. It’s worth noting that CPR-only courses may cover adults only or infants and children. Be sure to sign up for the course that’s right for you!

Your First Aid course work will cover how to control bleeding; what to do in the event of a head, neck or back injury; how to assess and treat injuries to limbs; how to respond to burns; how to treat minor injuries; how to identify and assess altered mental status; what to do in the event someone is experiencing breathing difficulty or shortness of breath; how to respond to chest pain, severe pressure, or chest discomfort; best steps for treating a victim of poisoning; and how to respond to environmental emergencies such as hypothermia or heat stroke.

Experience: Putting CPR and First Aid Lessons into Practice

Textbook, classroom, and online learning is great, but there’s nothing like hands-on training to reinforce your coursework. As part of your CPR training, you’ll have the opportunity to practice CPR with rescue breathing, AED use, and working as part of a 2 rescuer team.

Your instructor will also review your First Aid knowledge, taking you through the steps you’ve already learned to control bleeding, Epi Pen use, patient assessment, and more.

Confidence: Being Ready to Help (While Understanding Your Limitations)

Although you’ll gain the knowledge, skills, and experience you need to help someone in need, you’ll also learn about your boundaries and the limits of your abilities. Knowing what you can and cannot do is a huge part of building confidence. As a CPR/First Aid provider, your job is to help someone who is ill and injured and to keep them safe until more advanced medical treatment arrives. That’s it!

As an authorized Training Center, Cardio Partners and AED.com provides high quality and consistent training courses across the United States. Our courses are offered through the American Red Cross and the American Heart Association. For more information about blended or traditional CPR and First Aid training, call our team at 866-349-4362 or email us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

Your Reasons for Not Learning CPR Probably Aren’t Valid

Getting Your CPR and First Aid Certification is Easier than You Think

As a young athlete, I looked on anxiously as my coach responded confidently and calmly when a teammate collapsed from heat exhaustion and dehydration. I watched my mother howl in pain after being shot in the toe by a reveler’s stray New Year’s Eve bullet (true story). Although I had no real clue how to perform it, I steeled myself for the Heimlich when I watched my daughter inhale her first fish taco at an unsightly speed.

Over the years, I’ve stanched countless bloody noses and assessed minor sprains and major bruises, each time wondering, “Am I doing this correctly?”

Still, to my embarrassment, I never managed to take the plunge and sign up for a CPR and First Aid class.

If you’re anything like me, you’ve probably thought about getting your CPR and First Aid certifications but just never quite got around to it. Recently, however, I started writing for Cardio Partners. Over the past few months I’ve written posts with titles like “10 Reasons Why You Should Learn CPR” and “The Importance of CPR and AEDs: A Survivor’s Story” and found myself feeling increasingly unqualified to encourage others to sign up for CPR when I, myself, had yet to get certified.

So I decided to do something about it. A couple of weeks ago, I found myself as the lone writer in a small group of amiable YMCA of Middle Tennessee employees, compressing a steady rhythm on the chest of a well-used CPR manikin as my partners held the oxygen mask over its face, counted to 30, delivered rescue breaths, and prepared the AED to administer its life-saving shock.

Two and a half hours later, I was the proud holder of Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers, Basic First Aid, and Emergency Oxygen certification cards.

I Don’t Have the Time to Take a CPR Class!

Sound familiar? After discovering that “blended” classes incorporating online training with in-person live skills sessions were offered at my local Y, I realized that my biggest excuse was no longer valid.

Within moments of registering for the course, I received an email from the instructor with a link to the online portion of the course. Initially, I was a bit daunted by the sheer number of lessons required — I opted to become certified not only in CPR/AED, but also in Basic First Aid and Emergency Oxygen administration and had 46 lessons to complete and 3 exams to pass.

I soon discovered, however, that the lessons were short, easy-to-follow, and well-constructed.

Each lesson built nicely upon the one that preceded it and I found myself well-prepared to ace each of the three online exams.

Conveniently, I was able to complete the course in stages and at my own pace. Although it took me five days and a total of four hours to complete, I’m sure that quicker studies than myself could do so in a single session in as little as three hours.

I’m Waaaay Too Squeamish to Take a First Aid Course!

Yup. That’s me. I’m the person in the movie theater who covers her eyes and plugs her ears and whispers, “Is it over yet? Can I look?”

If I survived, you’re going to be just fine.

The videos are predictably staged, the blood is clearly fake, and the burns are obviously of the latex variety. Yeah, you’ll cringe a time or two, but you’ll make it.

I’m the Last Person You’d Want Performing CPR or First Aid!

Prior to completing the course, I’d have to say that statement fit me pretty well. Now that I’m far more confident in my abilities (while still being well aware of my limitations) I’d say that you could do worse than having me by your side in an emergency.

Michelle Mattox, a CPR/AED/First Aid/O2 Instructor at the Margaret Maddox Family YMCA in Nashville has certified hundreds of people over the years and says that she’s gotten a ton of positive feedback from her students, “It’s more effective when people take an online and in-person class because they get a chance to see it, hear it, and be taught the basics at their own pace and then in the class they can really focus on their skills and getting it right. It’s easier to digest that way. Pretty much everybody that I’ve talked to tells me that they feel more confident and that they know what to do.”

CPR Training is Too Expensive!

Costs may vary from provider to provider, but let me assure you, it’s quite reasonable. I recommend checking out the American Red Cross, the American Heart Association, or your local YMCA for an affordable course near you. Or, to arrange a training for your workplace or organization, call Cardio Partners or AED.com at 866-349-4362 or send an email to customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

Char Vandermeer is a freelance copywriter based in Nashville, TN. When she’s not writing she enjoys reading, gardening, kayaking, and soaking up the sunshine with her family.

AED Compliance Management

AED Compliance Management

Last week, we discussed the importance of having an AED in the workplace. This week, we’re taking a look at why it’s important to make sure your equipment is in compliance. At Cardio Partners, we’re committed to making sure that your workplace is both well-prepared and well-protected in the event of a medical emergency. In addition to our CPR and first aid training courses, AED sales and maintenance, and our comprehensive consultation services, our user-friendly online AED compliance management system helps ensure that your AED is both in compliance with local laws and is emergency-ready.

Why is AED Compliance Important?

Each year, more than 350,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur in the United States. Sudden cardiac arrest — an electrical malfunction in the heart that disrupts the flow of oxygenated blood to the brain and other vital organs — is a leading cause of death among Americans (American Heart Association). While these startling statistics make a strong case for the importance of CPR training and certification, they also shed light on the significance of properly maintained AEDs and investing in a full-service AED Compliance Management System for your workplace.

Out-of-compliance AEDs not only cost lives, but they result in heartbreakingly tragic and unnecessary lawsuits. Keep your AEDs in good working order with a reliable Compliance Management System. AED Compliance Management Systems are the easiest and safest way to make sure that your equipment is up-to-date and are ready to save lives. You can also dramatically reduce your legal liability by investing in a compliance system.

What Should Be Included in an AED Compliance Management System?

Whether you have a single AED or dozens, a user-friendly online AED compliance management system can help reduce your liability. Look for a system that includes the following features:

AED Registration

A full-service AED Compliance Management System makes it easy to register and track your life-saving devices. Make sure your team and your clients are well protected by keeping all pertinent information and instructions about your AEDs in an easily accessible place: at your fingertips.

Monthly AED Check Reminders

We understand that business owners, facilities managers, school administrators, executive directors, and medical personnel are busy. With so much on your plate, it’s easy to overlook AED maintenance checks. With Cardio Partners’ online AED Compliance Management System, however, you’ll never forget another check-in. Our system sends an email reminder every 30 days so you can enjoy peace of mind while keeping your focus on your business.

AED Check Logging

Many states require monthly inspections of AEDs. Online systems ensure that your equipment remains in compliance year-round.

AED Unit Readiness and Expiration Tracking

Even with monthly reminders, checks, and routine preventative maintenance, AEDs expire. Compliance Management Systems help keep you up-to-date and your equipment in good working order.

24-Hour AED Use Helpline

Whether you’re training new employees, have a general question about how to use your equipment, or need immediate assistance, full-service AED compliance management systems offer online chat, phone, email, and help desk support.

Resource Library Access

Laws regarding AEDs vary by state. We understand that finding the right information can be overwhelming! With an AED Compliance Management System from Cardio Partners, you’ll gain access to a comprehensive online library of legal, statutory, and regulatory requirements.

Medical Direction

Rest assured knowing that a physician medical director is assigned to provide, review, and approve current rescue protocols.

AED Prescription Maintenance

AEDs are manufactured and sold under guidelines approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA may require someone who purchases an AED to present a physician’s prescription for the device (American Heart Association). Compliance management systems help users maintain current prescriptions for their onsite AEDs.

AED Oversight

Leave compliance to the compliance professionals with a turn-key management system.

Courtesy Overdue Calls

If your inbox is overwhelmed and you missed our monthly email notifications, you’ll receive a courtesy call from our team 45 and 60 days after an overdue inspection. Don’t worry, we have you and your team covered.

Leave your AED compliance management to us. For more information about AED Compliance Management Systems, contact Cardio Partners at 866-349-4362 or email us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

Gasping Can Indicate Survival After Cardiac Arrest

According to the AHA, more than 350,000 people experience a non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) every year, averaging to more than 1,000 victims each day*. Among those statistics, only about 10 percent of OHCA victims survive. To combat these odds, however, a quick response with an automatic external defibrillator (AED) and CPR can improve the survival rate of an individual. In addition to the efforts of a rescuer, a recent study suggests gasping for air before or during CPR in an OHCA victim can actually be an indicator of survival with “favorable” brain function.

Gasping, or agonal respiration, is an individual’s natural reflex to allow for oxygen and circulation during CPR. This is said to be a marker for brainstem activity.

Remember, if someone is unresponsive and not breathing OR not breathing normally, start CPR.

According to researcher Guillaume Debaty, MD, this is the first report of its kind to stress the connection of gasping as a predictive factor to long-term survival and favorable brain function. Of those survivors, 37 percent had irregular respiration during CPR. This indicator is seen as a positive, which further solidifies the need for chest compressions during an OHCA on a gasping victim.

Following this study, researchers are recommending an emphasis be placed on identifying abnormal pattern breathing as an early sign of cardiac arrest. One of the authors of the report said it is a person’s natural response “deserving attention.” With this recent information, there is new stress on incorporating the recognition of gasping into CPR training. Researchers highlight the importance of rescuers correctly associating gasping as an indicator of cardiac arrest, rather than normal breathing.

Another goal for attributing gasping to cardiac arrest and survival rates is to help improve the lack of reporting and tracking around the phenomena in order to inform future research.

Are you thinking about CPR training? We hope so. Cardio Partners is a nationwide training center offering traditional classroom courses through the American Red Cross and the American Heart Association. Schedule CPR training by emailing customerservice@cardiopartners.com or by learning more here.

 Source: http://www.cpr.heart.org/AHAECC/CPRAndECC/General/UCM_477263_Cardiac-Arrest-Statistics.jsp

Commotio Cordis: Secret Killer in Young Athletes

Safety always comes before the game, especially when young people are involved. With sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) being the number one cause of death among student athletes, parents and coaches must be prepared for such an unimaginable event. Often times, SCA occurs in student athletes for one of these three reasons: A blow to the chest (Commotio Cordis); structural heart defects (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, Marfan syndrome, etc.); or electrical heart defects (long QT syndrome, Wolff-Parkinson White Syndromes, etc.).

Commotio Cordis is Latin for “agitation of the heart,” which occurs when there is a blow to the chest between heartbeats. This can trigger a SCA. According to a report by the UT Southwestern Medical Center, many of these incidents take place when youths are playing baseball, where the ball has the ability to travel at very high speeds. For example, when a student athlete is struck in the chest with a baseball, the heart will go into ventricular fibrillation. This means the heart will begin an uncoordinated quivering, and unless an external automatic defibrillator (AED) is present to shock the heart back into its appropriate rhythm, it will eventually stop.

Though Commotio Cordis is considered a rare event, is still the second most common cause of sudden death among athletes. It is most common in teenage boys, usually dropping off around the age of 20. The age factor —according to the UT report — could be related to the strengthening of the chest wall and a decline in playing sports after high school. Regardless, coaches and parents should learn to recognize the signs of Commotio Cordis in order to ensure the right precautions are taken for the safety of these athletes.

Be AED and CPR ready should you notice any of the below risk factors in a young athlete, especially if it follows trauma to the chest:

  • Fainting or seizures during or after exercising
  • Any indication of chest pains
  • Unexplained shortness of breath or long time to catch breath

http://www.aed.com/aed-packages-page/athletic-aed-packages.html