Category Archives: Uncategorized

CPR Songs: Greatest Hits to Save Lives

Cardio Partners Salutes CPR and AED Awareness Week With CPR Playlist

Happy CPR and AED Awareness week! Here at Cardio Partners, we’re supporting and promoting this important week with a curated Spotify playlist just for you! All of the songs on our Greatest Hits to Save Lives have a lifesaving tempo of 100 to 120 beats per minute, which is perfect for performing chest compressions during CPR. From Queen Bey to Queen, our playlist has a little something for everyone.

5 Fast Facts About Sudden Cardiac Arrest and CPR

Before we dive into some fun musical trivia, here are a few facts about sudden cardiac arrest (SCA).

Fact 1: You Nearly Gave Me a Heart Attack Isn’t Accurate

Did you know that cardiac arrest and heart attacks aren’t the same thing? SCA occurs when an electrical malfunction in the heart causes an arrhythmia (abnormal heartbeat) and disrupts the flow of blood to the brain and other vital organs. A heart attack occurs when a blockage in an artery prevents the flow of blood to your heart.

So the next time your troublemaking teen sneaks up on you and scares you half to death, instead of “You nearly gave me a heart attack!” try out “I nearly had a cardiac arrest, kid!”

Fact 2: It Takes Less Than a Minute to Learn How to Save a Life

While it takes more than a decade to become a doctor, did you know that compression-only or hands-only CPR takes just a minute to learn and just may save someone’s life? Check out NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital’s simple 30-second, three-step video:

  • Step 1: Check the Victim

Check to see if the victim is responsive but tapping firming on his shoulders and checking for signs of breathing. If you don’t see any indications of life, get moving!

  • Step 2: Call 911

Call 911 immediately.

  • Step 3: Compress

Begin chest compressions. Interlock your fingers and use the heel of your palm to press down on the center of the center of the chest at a rate of two compressions per second.

Fact 3: Sudden Cardiac Arrest is a Leading Cause of Death

Unless you live in Montana, the odds of getting hit by lightning are just about one in a million. Between 2001 and 2010, an average of 280 lightning deaths and injuries were reported each year. Yet the moment we see a flash of lightning we know what to do: we wisely run for cover!

In stark contrast, there are more than 350,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests each year and 90% of these are fatal. Only 46% of the people who suffer an out-of-hospital SCA receive the immediate help they need before EMS teams arrive on the scene. Would you know what to do? If not, learn CPR!

Fact 4: You Can Change the Statistics

While it’s demoralizing to learn that 90% of the people who suffer from an SCA die and 70% of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur in the home, it doesn’t help anyone to be fatalistic about it. Change the statistics! Learn CPR.

According to the American Heart Association, CPR (especially if performed immediately) can double or even triple a person’s chance for survival.

Fact 5: Our “Greatest Hits to Save Lives” Playlist is Great for the Gym

Look, we really, really hope that you’re not the kind of person who’s going to cue up our playlist before starting CPR on someone. That would be bad. So plug those earbuds in, start your warmup, and get your Body Movin’.

A Few Fun Facts About Our CPR Playlist

Fact 1: “Cecilia,” By Simon and Garfunkel, Was Banned in Malawi

Apparently, the Malawi Censorship Board wasn’t too pleased the song’s titular heroine, whose name was the same as President Banda’s “Official Hostess” (FileRoom).

Fact 2: “Girls Just Wanna’ Have Fun” Was First Recorded by a Man

Believe it or not, Cyndi Lauper’s 1983 breakthrough hit was written and first recorded by Robert Hazard in 1979 (Wikipedia).

Fact 3: “Crazy in Love” is Bey and Jay’s Only Chart-Topping Collaboration

While they may seemingly rule the universe, “Crazy in Love” is the power couple’s only #1 hit single (Forbes).

What You Need to Know About Young Athletes, Commotio Cordis, & Sudden Cardiac Arrest

Raising Awareness about SCA and Commotio Cordis in Youth

Many of us assume that the more than 350,000 Americans who suffer from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) each year are elderly or suffer from heart disease or other health conditions. While this is certainly true for many, it’s not true for all. In fact, SCA caused by commotio cordis is far more common on the high school playing field than in the halls of your local senior center.

What is Commotio Cordis?

The American Heart Association defines commotio cordis as “a phenomenon in which a sudden blunt impact to the chest causes sudden death in the absence of cardiac damage.” Although the condition was first described in laborers the mid-1700s, in the last couple of decades, commotio cordis events have occurred primarily in sports.

Today, this type of trauma is most often caused by the impact of a ball, hit, or puck to the chest. When an athlete takes a blow to the area directly over the heart at a critical time during the cycle of a heartbeat, it may cause cardiac arrest.

According to the HeartRescue Project, the risk of SCA is three times greater in competitive athletes. The average age of athletes who suffer from sudden cardiac arrest is just 17 and more than two-thirds of young athletes who die suddenly are basketball and football players. Baseball, softball, hockey, and lacrosse players, however, are especially susceptible to commotio cordis.

Even a seemingly insignificant or minor blow to the chest can cause commotio cordis, so it’s critical that members of the coaching staff, athletes, and parents are all well-informed.

Facts about Commotio Cordis

  • More than 224 cases have been reported to the US Commotio Cordis Registry since 1995. It’s estimated, however, that many more cases have not been reported.
  • Based on the Registry cases of commotio cordis the survival rate was 24%.
  • 95% of cases affected males.
  • Commotio cordis most frequently occurs in those aged between 10 and 18 years.
  • 50% of episodes occur during competitive sports, a further 25% occur during recreational sports, and the other 25% occurs during other activities that involve blunt force trauma to the chest wall.

(Source: Life in the Fast Lane)

Preventing Commotio Cordis and SCA Among Athletes

Unfortunately, there’s no way to completely prevent commotio cordis or SCA from occurring. However, by shining a light on the issue, coaches and athletes can reduce the incidence of life-threatening chest trauma and can maximize survival rates by adhering to the following recommendations.

Coach Responsibly

Young athletes should be educated about commotio cordis and should protect themselves and their teammates from taking direct blows to the chest during practice and game time. Coaching staff members should teach techniques that emphasize player safety and encourage players to turn away from the ball to avoid errant pitches, for example.

Consider Using Reduced Impact Balls

These “safety balls” are especially good options for our youngest athletes, who are in the skill-building stages of their development and training. Not only do these balls minimize injuries, but they reduce fear and improve confidence among young players.

Be Alert

If you see an athlete collapse on the field, be proactive! The American Heart Association notes that “resuscitation, once thought to be nearly universally unsuccessful, has now been demonstrated to be successful in up to 35% of commotio cordis victims.”

Learn CPR

Here at Cardio Partners, we believe in the power of CPR. As a team-building exercise, we recommending signing the whole team up for CPR training. Check out our post, 10 Reasons Why You Should Learn CPR, for more information.

Invest in an AED for Your School Gym and Your Fieldhouse

We’ve talked a lot about the importance of AEDs in the Workplace, but parents of athletes and survivors of commotio cordis would argue that the gymnasium and field house is just as important as a public hallway for automatic external defibrillator placement. In most instances, EMTs cannot reasonably be expected to arrive at the scene of a cardiac arrest in less than five minutes. Well-placed public-access AEDs may save the lives of countless young athletes.


AED.com and Cardio Partners offers CPR, first aid, AED, and bloodborne pathogen training courses in all 50 states in traditional classroom settings and in blended learning courses. To learn more about our courses or to equip your school’s athletic facilities with an AED, call our team at 866-349-4362 or email Cardio Partners at customerservice@cardiopartners.com. We’d love to hear from you!

Finding the Best Location for Your AED

Proper AED Placement

It’s reassuring to note that the United States holds the largest share of automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) in North America, with nearly 90% of the market, and that the AED market is predicted to grow by 6.8% (BusinessWire). Americans are increasingly aware of the dangers posed by sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and understand that AEDs save lives.

What’s less comforting to know is that many AEDs are kept under lock and key or are tucked away in a cluttered, forgotten corner.

According to the American Red Cross, it takes an average of 8-12 minutes for first responders to arrive on the scene after 911 is called. For each minute defibrillation is delayed, the chance of survival is reduced by approximately 10%. In other words, by the time the ambulance arrives with its cargo of lifesaving EMTs and AEDs, it may already be too late.

Make Your AED Visible

Are you ready? Here’s the number one tip for effective AED placement: make it visible! It may sound obvious, but hiding your valuable AED in a corner or stowing it in an office drawer isn’t going to do anyone any good. While it may be tempting to keep your equipment “out of harm’s way,” it’s far more important to make sure your AEDs are visible and are in good working order.

Keep it Simple

When someone shouts “Where’s the AED!?” You’ll want to be able to respond with a quick, clear direction such as “In the lobby!” or “By the elevator!”

Take Stock of Your AED Inventory

Do you have enough AEDs? Most AED manufacturers recommend that facilities have at least one AED per floor. As you consider your options for the best places to put your AED, make a list of central, high-traffic areas or areas where someone is most likely to go into sudden cardiac arrest (on the office treadmill, for example). If you’re not sure where to place your AEDs, Cardio Partners offers Cardiac Preparedness Consulting Services.

Signage is Your Friend

Don’t  let your aesthetic sense get in the way of common sense. Professional signage, with icons, should clearly mark AED locations and direct users to the device.

Ideally, rescuers should be able to assist the victim of an SCA in less than two minutes! AEDs and directional signs should be located in high visibility areas in public buildings and businesses and at social or athletic events.

Accessibility is Critical

AEDs should be readily accessible to all employees and to the public and should be within reach of wheelchair-bound individuals. Your AED cabinet should be mounted in an unobstructed area, 48 inches above the floor, to ensure that anyone can access it in the event of an emergency. Make sure that your employees can reach and remove the AED with one hand to minimize response time.

Be Strategic About AED Placement

Facilities managers should consider placing AEDs in areas where many people work closely together (such as assembly lines or office buildings), near confined spaces, in areas where electric-powered devices are used, and at outdoor worksites where lightning may strike (Health & Safety Institute).

Checklist: AED Placement Guidelines and Recommendations

  • Make sure that your AEDs are located in a clearly marked, brightly illuminated, and unobstructed location.
  • AEDs should be easy to reach and remove with one hand.
  • According to the Americans with Disability Act (ADA) guidelines, the height to reach the handle of an AED should be no more than 48 inches high. The maximum side reach for an unobstructed approach to an AED is 54 inches (CPR Seattle).
  • For maximum efficacy, be sure to train key personnel throughout the building in how to properly use an AED.
  • Regularly inspect your equipment for signs of tampering and to make sure it’s emergency-ready. You may want to consider investing in an AED Compliance Management program or a Preventative Maintenance Program.
  • Consider placing non-latex protective gloves, CPR face masks, scissors, safety razors (to shave the victim’s chest hair, as necessary), absorbent towels, and a first aid kit near your AED.

To learn more about our AED training courses or to purchase an AED, call our team at 866-349-4362 or email Cardio Partners at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

5 Tips for AED Program Management in the Workplace

Are your employees ready to respond to a cardiac emergency in the workplace?

The American Heart Association reported that in 2016, more than 350,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occurred. OSHA estimates that 10,000 sudden cardiac arrests occur each year in the workplace. The importance of having an Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) in your workplace is clear, and in fact, many work environments already have AEDs and first aid kits. But are you and your employees truly prepared to respond to a medical emergency in the workplace?

Unfortunately, recent data indicates that most employees are not prepared to handle cardiac emergencies. In a survey about cardiac emergency preparedness conducted last summer, the American Heart Association discovered that most workers do not have access to CPR and first aid training and that fully half of them were unable to locate an onsite AED. In the hospitality industry, where employees are welcoming guests who are unfamiliar with a property, 66% of those surveyed cannot locate an AED.

In response to the findings, Michael Kurz, M.D., Associate Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, said, “the data suggests these untrained employees may be relying on their untrained peers in the event of an emergency, leaving employees with a false sense of security.”

At Cardio Partners, it’s our goal to help ensure that organizations and individuals are well-prepared and ready to act in the event of a cardiac or medical emergency in the workplace.

5 Best Practices for AED Program Management in the Workplace.

Enlist an AED and First Aid Advocate

Whether you work for a Fortune 500 corporation with thousands of employees and hundreds of AEDs or you’re an entrepreneur with a single AED and one or two employees, it’s important to make sure that your team is as committed to safety and emergency readiness as you are.

First, identify employees who are well-respected by their peers and who you think would be interested in helping you promote workplace safety and cardiac awareness. Be sure to share information about your AED program with them, including information about what AEDs are and how they work.

These in-house champions will help promote your emergency readiness plans and can educate their peers about the importance of AEDs and first aid training. They’ll also replace the false sense of security some untrained employees may feel with a clear resource for information and instruction about emergency first aid.

Keep Your AEDs in Plain Sight

Timing is critical when it comes to administering CPR or defibrillation. For every minute that passes without CPR or defibrillation, the chances of survival decrease 7-10% (American Heart Association).

For optimal AED placement, OSHA recommends that AEDs be conveniently installed to ensure response within 3 to 5 minutes, near a confined space, in:

  • Areas where many people work closely together, such as assembly lines and office buildings.
  • Areas where electric-powered devices are used.
  • Outdoor worksites where lightning may occur.
  • Health units where workers may seek treatment for heart attack symptoms.
  • Company fitness units and cafeterias.
  • Remote sites, such as offshore drilling rigs, construction projects, marine vessels, power transmission lines, and energy pipelines.

Invest in an AED Compliance Management System

Make sure that your AEDs are in compliance and are emergency-ready with a user-friendly AED Compliance Management System. Online systems such as Cardio Partners’ Premium AED Compliance Management System ensure that your equipment is properly registered, checked, logged, and that your physician’s prescription is up-to-date. These systems can also help you track the expiration dates of your defibrillators’ batteries and pads.

Spring for Training

Now that you have an AED cheerleader, you’ve placed your devices strategically, and you’ve committed to an AED Compliance Management System, you’ll want to make sure that your employees know how to use your emergency medical equipment. You’ll also want to make sure they know how to recognize a sudden cardiac arrest and how they should go about activating your emergency response plan.

It’s worth noting that more than 90% of the employees who participated in the two American Heart Association surveys said they would take employer-sponsored CPR and first aid training courses. Improve safety by boosting your employees’ confidence. Enroll your team in CPR, First Aid, and AED courses today!

Practice Makes Perfect

Be sure to include AEDs in your emergency response drills. Emergency readiness drills can help ensure that your employees know where your AEDs are located and how to use them.

For more information about AED best practices in the workplace or to schedule a cardiac preparedness consultation, contact www.aed.com at 866-349-4362 or email us at customerservice@aed.com.

10 Reasons Why You Should Learn CPR

The Importance of CPR Training and Certification

If you’re still cooking up your resolutions for the new year, we have a humble suggestion for you: add CPR training to your list. CPR helps keep blood and oxygen flowing and dramatically increases the chances of survival in those who suffer a cardiac arrest.

Here are 10 great reasons why you should learn CPR this year:

Heart Disease is the Leading Cause of Death in the United States

According to the CDC, heart disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S., claiming the lives of more than 600,000 people each year.

CPR Saves Lives

While heart disease is on the rise, CPR can help save lives. According to the American Heart Association, more than 350,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occurred in 2016. Sadly, 88% of people who suffer from a cardiac arrest outside of the hospital die. However, when properly and promptly performed, CPR can dramatically improve person’s chance of survival.  

Anyone Can Learn CPR

Anyone can learn CPR and everyone should. The American Heart Association reports that 70% of Americans feel helpless to act in the event of a cardiac emergency because they either do not know how to effectively administer CPR or their training has lapsed.

The Life You Save May Be That of a Loved One

Did you know that four out of five cardiac arrests occur at home? Not only that, but many victims of sudden cardiac arrest appear healthy and may not have any known heart diseases or risk factors. Performing CPR promptly may save the life of someone you love.

Prevent Brain Death

Brain death occurs four to six minutes after the heart stops breathing. CPR effectively keeps blood flowing and provides oxygen to the brain and other vital organs, giving the victim a better chance for full recovery. Everyday Health reports that If CPR is given within the first two minutes of cardiac arrest, the chances of survival double.

CPR Makes You Smarter

Let’s face it, by the time you complete CPR training, you’ll know something that you didn’t know before you started!

You’ll Feel Confident in the Event of A Cardiac Emergency

CPR classes will equip you with the tools and the confidence you need to transform yourself from the role of bystander to lifesaver. CPR certification will give you the necessary training to make the right decisions in the event of a cardiac emergency.

CPR Classes are Fun

By nature, CPR classes are hands-on and interactive. While there may be some online training involved, course participants will learn how to properly execute chest compressions in a fun and supportive environment.

You’ll Test Your Musical Knowledge

The tempo at which you should give chest compressions lines up nicely with popular musical gems such as the Bee Gees’ “Stayin’ Alive,” “Walk Like an Egyptian” by the Bangles, and “Save a Horse (Ride a Cowboy)” by country duo Big and Rich.

Join the 3 Percent

An online resource for emergency medical services personnel, EMS1, notes that “Although evidence indicates that bystander CPR and AED use can significantly improve survival and outcomes from cardiac arrest, each year less than 3% of the U.S. population receives CPR training, leaving many bystanders unprepared to respond to cardiac arrest.” Become a part of the solution and sign up for a CPR training course today.


Cardio Partners is a trusted nationwide CPR training center
. We offer CPR, First Aid, AED, and bloodborne pathogen training courses in all 50 states in traditional classroom settings and in blended learning courses. To learn more about our courses or to schedule a training, call our team at 866-349-4362 or email Cardio Partners at customerservice@cardiopartners.com. We’d love to hear from you!

Cardio Partners awarded by American Red Cross

 

Brentwood, TN – Cardio Partners, Inc., a Sarnova company specializing in cardiac products, services and solutions, was awarded by the American Red Cross as their top strategic training partner. Cardio Partners is currently the #1 training provider of American Red Cross BLS First Aid/AED/CPR courses, supplying both traditional and blended courses to companies and individuals nationally.

Cardio Partners offers over 25 CPR and emergency preparedness courses including all relevant courses from the American Red Cross (ARC). With over 500 licensed instructors nationwide and over 350,000 people certified, Cardio Partners is at the forefront of cardiac solutions and training. Brian Leonard, Director of Field Sales and Training, stated:

“Cardio Partners truly appreciates this award. The American Red Cross is a true partner to Cardio Partners working together both organizations have become stronger. This partnership has been key to the growth of Cardio Partners and look forward to a strong relationship for many years to come.”

Jack McMaster, President PHSS Divsion of the American Red Cross, presented the award to Cardio Partners at the Emergency Cardiovascular Care Update (ECCU) Conference in New Orleans. The ECCU mission is to save lives from sudden cardiac arrest by stimulating effective community, professional and citizen action.

About Cardio Partners, Inc.:

Cardio Partners is a national leader in emergency prevention and an ardent advocate in the fight against Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA). Cardio Partners provides consultation, equipment and end-to-end training, offering a complete cardiac solution to customers. As an authorized master distributer of all FDA-approved defibrillator devices, the company provides customers the best-in-class value for new and recertified equipment. Customers’ emergency preparedness needs are met via Cardio Partners’ nationwide CPR training courses and state-of-the-art program management services. For more information, visit www.cardiopartners.com.

About Sarnova:

Sarnova is the leading national specialty distributor of healthcare products in the emergency medical services (EMS) and acute care markets. The company is comprised of four major business units: Bound Tree Medical, Cardio Partners, Emergency Medical Products and Tri-anim Health Services. Sarnova is a company of Water Street Healthcare Partners, a strategic investor focused exclusively on the health care industry. For more information, visit www.sarnova.com.

Media Contact:

Jake Swartz, Senior Marketing Manager, (866) 349-4363, jacob.swartz@cardiopartners.com

Tom Metcalf Promoted to President, Acute and Brian LaDuke Joins Sarnova as President, Emergency Preparedness

DUBLIN, Ohio – Sarnova Inc., parent company to four fast-growing business units: Bound Tree Medical, Cardio Partners, Emergency Medical Products and Tri-anim Health Services, announced today the creation of two major leadership roles at the company.

 

Tom Metcalf has been promoted to the new position of President, Acute, from his previous role as Senior Vice President of Acute & EMS Sales. Tom will be responsible for managing the leaders of Tri-anim Health Services’ sales, health systems, sales operations and product management teams and will assume full P&L responsibility for Sarnova’s Acute business. Throughout his six-year tenure at Sarnova, Tom has assumed larger responsibilities and transformed the company’s sales teams. Prior to joining Sarnova, Tom held sales leadership positions with GE Healthcare, Boston Scientific, Johnson & Johnson and other noted companies in the medical device space.

 

Brian LaDuke joins Sarnova as President, Emergency Preparedness. In this newly created position, Brian will oversee the sales and product management teams and have full P&L responsibility for Bound Tree Medical, Cardio Partners and Emergency Medical Products. Prior to joining Sarnova, Brian served as a Vice President responsible for multiple divisions at Invacare Corporation with oversight of sales, marketing and operations. Through his leadership, he helped grow Invacare into a leading global provider of home and long-term care medical products.

 

“These organizational changes come as a direct result of the success we are experiencing as a company,” said Jeff Prestel, CEO. “The new organization structure is a natural next step in our journey to become the best company in specialty medical sales and distribution.”

 

About Sarnova:

Sarnova is the leading national specialty distributor of healthcare products in the emergency medical services (EMS) and acute care markets. The company is comprised of four major business units:  Bound Tree Medical, Cardio Partners, Emergency Medical Products and Tri-anim Health Services. Sarnova is a company of Water Street Healthcare Partners, a strategic investor focused exclusively on the health care industry. For more information, visit www.sarnova.com.

 

Media Contact:

Beth Scott, Director of Marketing Communications

(614) 760-5000

beth.scott@sarnova.com