Tag Archives: AED

6 Shocking Statistics About Sudden Cardiac Arrest and AEDs

SCA and AEDs By the Numbers (And What We Can Do About It)

To kick off the National Sudden Cardiac Awareness month and to usher in October, we’re sharing a few spook-worthy statistics about SCA.

Shocking Stat #1: Each year, more than 356,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) occur in the United States.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest Awareness Month

Taken a step further, about 90% of the people who experience an OHCA will die. While these numbers are nothing short of staggering, The American Heart Association also notes that “CPR, especially if administered immediately after cardiac arrest, can double or triple a person’s chance of survival.”

What is CPR and how does it work? Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is an easy-to-learn lifesaving procedure undertaken by first responders or bystanders in an effort to maintain the flow of oxygen to and from the brain and other vital organs. Often, artificial respiration (mouth-to-mouth or bag-valve mask ventilation) accompany manual chest compressions; however, compression-only CPR is an increasingly accepted method as well.

Let’s make a dent in the statistics! Cardio Partners offers nationwide CPR training; contact us to learn more.

Shocking Stat #2: Among middle-aged adults treated for SCA, 50% had no symptoms before the onset of arrest.

Much like SCA survivor Rob Seymour (who we profiled back in March), 50% of people who experience cardiac arrest demonstrate no warning signs.

However, when we flip that stat on its head, a whopping 50% of the people who experience SCA do exhibit warning signs in the hours, days, and weeks prior to the event, and only 19% of the symptomatic patients called emergency medical services to report their symptoms (National Center for Biotechnology Information).

Be heart-aware and be on the lookout for symptoms such as:

  • Pain or discomfort in the chest.
  • Lightheadedness, nausea, or vomiting.
  • Jaw, neck, or back pain.
  • Discomfort or pain in the arm or shoulder.
  • Shortness of breath.

Want to dig a little deeper? Read our post, “What’s the Difference Between a Heart Attack and Sudden Cardiac Arrest?

Shocking Stat #3: 475,000 Americans die from a cardiac arrest every year and 17.5 million people across the globe die from cardiovascular disease each year.

These figures, courtesy of the American Heart Association and the World Heart Federation, demonstrate just how important it is to take care of your heart! Put yet another way, in the United States, SCA claims more lives than colorectal cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, influenza, pneumonia, auto accidents, HIV, firearms, and house fires combined.

Just last week, in celebration of World Heart Day, we shared a few of our favorite heart-healthy tips!

Shocking Stat #4: 10,000 SCAs occur in the workplace each year.

The Occupational Health and Safety Administration strongly encourages the placement of AEDs in the workplace, yet no federal regulations exist.

Take a look at this example, cited on OSHA’s website: “While standing on a fire escape during a building renovation, a 30-year-old construction worker was holding a metal pipe with both hands. The pipe contacted a high voltage line, and the worker instantly collapsed. About 4 minutes later, a rescue squad arrived and began CPR. Within six minutes the squad had defibrillated the worker. His heartbeat returned to normal and he was transported to a hospital. The worker regained consciousness and was discharged from the hospital within two weeks.”

What can you do to improve SCA survival rates among your employees? Implement an AED program in your workplace today! Affordable, recertified AEDs start at just $550 and implementing an emergency response plan is priceless. Ready to take the plunge? We’ll help you figure out which AED is right for you.

Shocking Stat #5: 68.5% of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur at home.

It should go without saying, but we’re going to go ahead and say it: saving a life is, without a doubt, the best reason for learning CPR. Because four out of five cardiac arrests occur at home, performing CPR promptly and investing in an AED for your home may save the life of someone you love.

And, in case you’re curious, 21% OHCAs occurred in public settings and 10.5% occurred in nursing homes.

Shocking Stat #6: 45% of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims survive when bystander CPR is administered.

See, it’s not all bad news! Not only that, but the American Heart Association recently published an article revealing that more people are stepping up to offer CPR when someone’s heart stops.

However, despite that fact that first responders are “intervening at higher levels,” survival rates remain higher for men than for women.

One of the researchers associated with the study, Dr. Carolina Malta Hansen, a researcher at Duke Clinical Research Institute, said that a number of factors might have contributed to the outcomes. “Compared to male victims of cardiac arrests, women are more likely to have cardiomyopathy, or disease of the heart muscle, and non-shockable rhythms that can’t be treated with defibrillation. Women who suffer cardiac arrests also tend to be older than men and live at home alone, with less chance of CPR being performed.”

In the article, Hansen goes on to note that there’s a great need to strengthen all the links in the chain of survival and that “the most important thing for the general public to know is that bystander intervention is paramount. You shouldn’t be afraid of doing something wrong, because anything is better than nothing: Stepping in and starting CPR and applying an AED before EMS arrives is the foundation for survival.”

For more information about purchasing a new or recertified AED for your home or workplace, or to schedule AED training or maintenance, visit AED.com or call Cardio Partners at 866-349-4362. We also welcome your emails, you can reach us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

AED Batteries: Rechargeable vs. Non-rechargeable

Which AED Battery is Right For You?

AED Battery

When deciding which AED is right for you, there are plenty of important considerations ranging from weight to overall cost to ease of maintenance. Because the type of battery your AED requires has a direct impact on weight, cost, and maintenance, this week we’re devoting an entire post to the topic.

Not only will we cover the pros and cons of non-rechargeable AED batteries versus rechargeable batteries, but we’ll provide you with a complete product list detailing the type of battery that powers each device.

Pros and Cons of Non-Rechargeable AED Batteries

Pro: Extended Battery Life

Most non-rechargeable lithium AED batteries have a useful lifespan of four to five years, assuming the device remains in “standby” mode. When your device remains in “standby,” battery use is minimal. In fact, it’s only in use only when your AED performs automatic, routine self-tests.

Pro: Low Maintenance

Non-rechargeable batteries are extremely easy-to-use and require very little or no maintenance. Simply insert the battery or batteries into your AED and you’re good to go! Non-rechargeable AED batteries are good options for non-professional, low-use settings such as an office or residential environment.

Con: Cost

If your AED sees repeated use, and therefore experiences frequent battery drain, you may find that replacing non-rechargeable AED batteries can be costly. AEDs with non-rechargeable batteries are best-suited for rare to occasional use.

Con: Environmental Impact

Lithium batteries should be properly recycled to minimize environmental harm. First, refer to your AED user guide to determine what kind of AED battery your device uses. We encourage you to contact the manufacturer of your device to determine whether or not they have a recycling program. If you’re unable to recycle your AED battery through the manufacturer, contact your local recycling center for recommendations.

Rechargeable AED Batteries

Pro: Best Battery for Professional Rescuers

Although the initial cost of a rechargeable battery is comparable to non-rechargeable batteries, rechargeable AED batteries are most commonly used by professional rescuers. When an AED is in a high-use environment, battery drain can be significant. In this scenario, recharging is more practical, efficient, environmentally friendly, and cost-effective than replacing a non-rechargeable battery on a monthly basis!

Con: Limited Battery Lifespan

It’s not at all uncommon for rechargeable batteries to be replaced after two years. Your device will alert you when it’s time to replace the battery.

Con: Charging Time and AED Downtime

Charging time varies by manufacturer and may range from two to 10 hours. If your AED sees frequent use, we strongly urge you to consider investing in a backup battery so your AED is always rescue-ready.

Con: Maintenance and Additional Costs

Unlike non-rechargeable batteries, rechargeable batteries need to be recharged frequently. In many instances, batteries need to be recharged monthly. You’ll also need a manufacturer-specific charging station.

AED Battery Type By Manufacturer

Non-Rechargeable

ZOLL AED Plus

ZOLL AED Pro

Cardiac Science Powerheart G3 Pro

Cardiac Science Powerheart G3

Cardiac Science Powerheart G5

Physio-Control LIFEPAK 1000

Philips HeartStart OnSite

Philips HeartStart FR3

Philips HeartStart FRx

HeartSine Samaritan PAD 350

HeartSine Samaritan PAD 450

HeartSine Samaritan PAD 360

Defibtech Lifeline

Defibtech Lifeline View

Rechargeable

ZOLL AED Pro

Cardiac Science Powerheart G3 Pro

Physio-Control LIFEPAK CR Plus

Physio-Control LIFEPAK Express

Generally speaking, we recommend AEDs with rechargeable batteries for professional rescuers or when a device is likely to see frequent use, either in a rescue or monitoring situation. For non-medical or infrequent use, long-lasting non-rechargeable batteries are advised.

The History of Defibrillation, Defibrillators and Portable AEDs

From dogs to tablespoons to Zolls, AEDs have come a long way

As you can tell, we’re on a bit of a history kick here at Cardio Partners and AED.com! This week we’re dialing the way-back machine to 1899 to learn more about the origins of defibrillation and the birth of AEDs. To learn more about the History of CPR, check out last week’s post!

1899: The Dog Days of Defibrillation

Defibrillation was discovered at the University of Geneva in 1899 by physiologists Jean-Louis Prevost and Frédéric Batelli. In the course of their research on ventricular fibrillation — a condition that occurs when the heart beats with rapid and erratic electrical impulses and causes the chambers in the heart to quiver ineffectively — they discovered that they could induce fibrillation in dogs and then, with an even higher jolt, defibrillate by applying high-current shocks directly to the surface of the heart.

Admittedly, this was a pretty significant discovery, but because they used a very high voltage, the poor pup’s heart was ultimately incapacitated and subsequent defibrillation theories focused more on the harmful effects of the procedure rather than the potential positive, life-saving effects we’re all familiar with today (National Center for Biotechnology Information).

1933: Self-Starter for Dead Man’s Heart

A generation later, in October of 1933, Popular Mechanics ran an article about Dr. Albert S. Hyman’s promising new invention, Hyman’s Otor.

The device was essentially a “hollow steel needle, through which a carefully insulated wire runs to the open point. Both the needle itself and its central wire are connected to the terminals of a light, spring-driven generator, provided with a current-interrupting device. This mechanism can be adjusted to give electrical impulses with the frequency of the heart-beat from infancy to old age. When the physician faces a case of heart stoppage, he inserts the needle between the first and second ribs into the right auricle of the heart, and starts the generator at the required frequency” (Source: Modern Mechanix).

The device was tested on animals and revived 14 out of 43 victims of cardiac arrest (Science Museum, London). Even though the device received positive press coverage, it was perceived as interfering with natural events and was not accepted by the medical community.

1947: What a Difference a Decade Makes…and Spoons

If you’ve been wondering where the tablespoons come in, you’re about to find out! The first successful defibrillation was reported by an American surgeon, Dr. Claude S. Beck, in 1947.

His patient, a 14-year-old boy, “tolerated the surgery well but went into cardiac arrest during closure” (Resuscitation Journal). Using a combination of direct cardiac massage, drugs, and a shock delivered by what appears to be gauze-covered spoons, the boy was successfully resuscitated (Case Western Reserve University).

1950: Zoll Begins Working on an External Pacemaker

Yes, the Zoll that we all know and love was founded by a Harvard cardiologist and an AED pioneer. “In 1952, Dr. Zoll and a team of other doctors in Boston applied electric charges externally to the chest to resuscitate two patients whose hearts had stopped. The first patient lived only 20 minutes. The second patient survived for 11 months, after 52 hours of electrical stimulation” (New York Times).

1965: Defibrillators Go Mobile

In 1965, a professor from Northern Ireland, Frank Pantridge, invented the world’s first portable defibrillator. Known as  “the father of emergency medicine,” Pantridge’s device relied on a car battery for current. The 150 pound device was installed in an ambulance and was first used in 1966 (BBC News).

1972: LBJ is Saved Today

In 1972, when President Lyndon B. Johnson suffered a massive heart attack at his daughter’s Virginia home, he was revived by a portable defibrillator.

“Dr. Richard S. Crampton of the University of Virginia Medical School in Charlottesville, who rushed a mobile coronary care unit to former President Lyndon B. Johnson…said in an interview: ‘It has tremendous potential application. Conceptually, this ought to be on every plane, train, bus, at stations and at airports, in case someone suddenly collapses. It’s like a fire extinguisher; you just hang it on the wall and you go put out the fire, which happens to be ventricular fibrillation’” (New York Times).

2018: Where We Are With AEDs Now

Today, portable AEDs are so easy to use that many states require their placement in schools, sports arenas, airports, health clubs, casinos, and other public places. Portable AEDs are also available for home use.

Unlike professor Pantridge’s “portable” defibrillator, modern AEDs typically weigh approximately 3 pounds and are fully automated.

For the full scoop on CPR or AEDs, CPR and AED Training, or to purchase an AED, visit AED.com or call Cardio Partners at 866-349-4362. You can also email us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

Which Automated External Defibrillator (AED) is Right for You?

AED Buyer’s Guide: 5 Things to Consider When Choosing an AED

Why are AEDs so Important?

So you’ve decided to purchase an AED. Good for you! The statistics surrounding sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) are sobering, but your decision to buy an Automated External Defibrillator for your home or workplace may save a life. Here at Cardio Partners and AED.com, we’re ready to help you find the one that’s best for you or your organization!

Did you know that more than 350,000 Americans suffer from cardiac arrest each year? Approximately 10,000 of these occur in the workplace (OSHA) and a staggering 70% of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur at home. At least 20,000 lives could be saved annually by prompt use of AEDs (American Heart Association).

In other words, if you are called on to perform CPR or to administer a shock from an AED, you’re likely working to save the life of someone you know and love. The American Heart Association (AHA) also notes that communities with AED programs, which include comprehensive CPR and AED training, have achieved survival rates of 40% or higher for cardiac arrest victims.

AEDs save lives by restoring normal heart rhythms in individuals who suffer sudden cardiac arrest.

An AED is a small, portable and user-friendly electronic device that can automatically diagnose and respond to life-threatening heart rhythms. Most AEDs provide simple, easy-to-follow audio and visual instructions that bystanders can quickly comprehend and apply. Some AEDs advise the user when to administer the shock, while other AEDs may automatically apply a shock if the heart is arrhythmic.

So what are you waiting for? Here’s everything you need to know about finding the right AED for your home or business.

1) Price

As with any technology, prices for AEDs vary widely. When considering price, think about your needs, your training, and how often and under what conditions your AED is likely to be used.

recertified Cardiac Science Powerheart G3 comes in at a modest $595 while a new Zoll AED Pro is priced at $2895. Professionals rescuers can appreciate the Zoll’s See-Thru CPR® feature, which allows them to see a patient’s underlying cardiac rhythm during resuscitation efforts. This feature enables more consistent, interruption-free compressions.

2) Pads

When it comes to AED pads, one-size-fits-all isn’t an option. Broadly speaking, there are two types of AED pads: Adult and pediatric. Consider the population you’re most likely to use your AED on and purchase your equipment accordingly. If, for example, your AED is placed on a shop floor or in a retirement community, it’s unlikely you’ll need pediatric pads! If your AED is going to be placed in a school setting, however, you may want to consider a school AED package that includes both adult and pediatric pads.

3) Batteries

Pretty much every AED manufacturer has a unique battery that’s patented for the exclusive use in their machines. Although most AED batteries are non-rechargeable, devices with rechargeable batteries are also available. Some AEDs, like the Zoll AED Plus, even use standard consumer 123 lithium batteries!

Once again, how you plan on using your device should determine whether you select a unit with a rechargeable battery or one with a non-rechargeable battery. Bottom line: If you’re a professional who regularly uses an AED, a rechargeable battery may be right for you. CPR and AED instructors may also benefit from rechargeable training units such as the Defibtech Lifeline AED Trainer. However, If your AED is rarely used, a low-maintenance non-rechargeable battery (with a longer lifespan) may be the best bet.

Remember, a well-charged and up-to-date AED battery is essential to the proper functioning of your device! If you are purchasing an AED for your home or office, we highlyrecommend that you to invest in an AED Compliance Management Program.

4) IP Rating

Every AED has an IP code. This “International Protection Rating” or “Ingress Protection Rating” is a code which classifies the level of protection an electrical device (like an AED) provides against liquid and dust. If you’re shopping for a poolside AED, look for a high IP rating and consider a waterproof Pelican Case.

5) Size

If you’re planning on mounting your AED cabinet to the wall and forgetting about it until your compliance management program sends you a maintenance reminder, then size doesn’t matter. However, if your AED follows you wherever your team travels, then you’ll want to find a light and compact unit, like the Philips HeartStart OnSite AED.

For more information about purchasing a new or recertified AED or to schedule a free consultation, visit AED.com or call Cardio Partners at 866-349-4362. You can also email us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

8 Pool Safety Tips and AED Best Practices for a Safe, Happy, and Healthy Summer!

Why is Pool Safety Important?

As visions of summer vacation dance in the minds of kids, parents, and teachers, it’s time to either start preparing your backyard pool for the flocks of neighborhood children or to renew that expired pool membership!

Before you take that first plunge into the deep end, however, it’s important to take a moment to reflect on the importance of pool safety. According to the Centers for Disease Control, “Drownings are a leading cause of injury death for young children ages 1 to 14, and three children die every day as a result of drowning. In fact, drowning kills more children 1 to 4 than anything else except birth defects.”

In a ten-year period from 2005-2014, there were an average of 3,536 drowning deaths in the United States each year. That’s more than 10 deaths per day!

Here at Cardio Partners and AED.com, we want to make sure that everyone stays safe this glorious summer!

Tip #1: Make Sure Your Poolside Guests Know How to Swim!

May is National Water Safety Month and we think it’s the perfect time to enroll your child in swim lessons. Here’s a statistic we can get behind: the CDC estimates that the risk of drowning is decreased by nearly 90% when young children take swimming lessons. Naturally, grown-ups and teens can benefit from refresher courses, First Aid classes, CPR certification, or lifeguarding classes. Check out your local Parks & Recreation schedule or try a nearby YMCA or Red Cross.

Tip #2: Invest in Personal Flotation Devices and Life Saving Equipment

If you have a pool, you need personal flotation devices and life-saving equipment. We recommend that all non-swimmers wear a U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacket or personal flotation device—even in the shallow end! We agree, those little donut-shaped swimmies and dinosaur floaties are super cute and noodles are tons of fun, but they’re not designed to prevent drowning.

Tip #3: Know the Signs of Drowning and Secondary Drowning

Contrary to every splashy Hollywood movie ever released, a person who is drowning probably won’t wave their hands in the air and cry desperately for help. They’ll be too busy trying to breathe to use that precious oxygen for shouting. More often than not, death by drowning is silent, so keep your eyes and your ears open.

Drowning Warning Signs

If your guest has gone silent and still in the water, check in and ask them to respond verbally. If the person is unable to respond, or their expression is blank, get them out of the water immediately!

Symptoms of Dry (or Secondary) Drowning

Dry drowning, or secondary drowning is also a very real danger. The American Osteopathic Association writes: “Dry and secondary drowning can occur after inhaling water through the nose or mouth. In cases of dry drowning, the water triggers a spasm in the airway, causing it to close up and impact breathing. Unlike dry drowning, delayed or secondary drowning occurs when swimmers have taken water into their lungs. The water builds up over time, eventually causing breathing difficulties.”

Tip # 4: Designate a “Lifeguard”

If you’re hosting a pool party, hiring a lifeguard may seem equal parts excessive and over-cautious, but it may be worth considering. First Aid and poolside CPR-certified lifeguards typically earn $10-15 an hour and are worth every penny in peace of mind. For smaller, family affairs, be sure to select a strong swimmer who is also CPR or First Aid certified as your designated watcher.

Tip #5: Invest in a First Aid Kit and an AED

There’s a reason why so many states have passed AED Legislation mandating the placement of AEDs in schools and sporting facilities. For a victim of Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA), an AED can be a lifesaver. AEDs are designed for use in a variety of adverse conditions.

If you need to use an AED on someone who has been swimming or has recently been pulled from the pool, remove any clothing and dry his or her chest as thoroughly as possible. Be sure there are no puddles around you, the patient, or the AED. Apply the pads and follow the device’s voice prompts. Every AED cautions responders and bystanders to stand clear of the patient.

Tip # 6: Pick a Swim Buddy!

Younger kids should have always have a swim buddy! Make sure your young swimmers can identify their swimming buddy and encourage clear communication. Even with the buddy system in place, never leave children unattended in the pool.

Tip # 7: Safety First!

You should check your local ordinances to make sure that your pool enclosure is in compliance with local regulations. Always securely lock your pool area when you’re not using it. And finally, make sure that you have access to a phone (preferably a water-resistant one) at all times in the case of an emergency.

Tip #8: Jump On In! (Feet-first, of Course!)

Diving headfirst into swimming pool can result in serious injury or death. Teach children how to jump into a pool feet-first and away from the pool’s concrete edge. Cannonballs are encouraged!

Get yourself pool-ready and water-safe. Enroll in a First Aid and AED Certification course today. Call our team at 866-349-4362 or visit AED.com or CardioPartners.com for more information.

Your Reasons for Not Learning CPR Probably Aren’t Valid

Getting Your CPR and First Aid Certification is Easier than You Think

As a young athlete, I looked on anxiously as my coach responded confidently and calmly when a teammate collapsed from heat exhaustion and dehydration. I watched my mother howl in pain after being shot in the toe by a reveler’s stray New Year’s Eve bullet (true story). Although I had no real clue how to perform it, I steeled myself for the Heimlich when I watched my daughter inhale her first fish taco at an unsightly speed.

Over the years, I’ve stanched countless bloody noses and assessed minor sprains and major bruises, each time wondering, “Am I doing this correctly?”

Still, to my embarrassment, I never managed to take the plunge and sign up for a CPR and First Aid class.

If you’re anything like me, you’ve probably thought about getting your CPR and First Aid certifications but just never quite got around to it. Recently, however, I started writing for Cardio Partners. Over the past few months I’ve written posts with titles like “10 Reasons Why You Should Learn CPR” and “The Importance of CPR and AEDs: A Survivor’s Story” and found myself feeling increasingly unqualified to encourage others to sign up for CPR when I, myself, had yet to get certified.

So I decided to do something about it. A couple of weeks ago, I found myself as the lone writer in a small group of amiable YMCA of Middle Tennessee employees, compressing a steady rhythm on the chest of a well-used CPR manikin as my partners held the oxygen mask over its face, counted to 30, delivered rescue breaths, and prepared the AED to administer its life-saving shock.

Two and a half hours later, I was the proud holder of Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers, Basic First Aid, and Emergency Oxygen certification cards.

I Don’t Have the Time to Take a CPR Class!

Sound familiar? After discovering that “blended” classes incorporating online training with in-person live skills sessions were offered at my local Y, I realized that my biggest excuse was no longer valid.

Within moments of registering for the course, I received an email from the instructor with a link to the online portion of the course. Initially, I was a bit daunted by the sheer number of lessons required — I opted to become certified not only in CPR/AED, but also in Basic First Aid and Emergency Oxygen administration and had 46 lessons to complete and 3 exams to pass.

I soon discovered, however, that the lessons were short, easy-to-follow, and well-constructed.

Each lesson built nicely upon the one that preceded it and I found myself well-prepared to ace each of the three online exams.

Conveniently, I was able to complete the course in stages and at my own pace. Although it took me five days and a total of four hours to complete, I’m sure that quicker studies than myself could do so in a single session in as little as three hours.

I’m Waaaay Too Squeamish to Take a First Aid Course!

Yup. That’s me. I’m the person in the movie theater who covers her eyes and plugs her ears and whispers, “Is it over yet? Can I look?”

If I survived, you’re going to be just fine.

The videos are predictably staged, the blood is clearly fake, and the burns are obviously of the latex variety. Yeah, you’ll cringe a time or two, but you’ll make it.

I’m the Last Person You’d Want Performing CPR or First Aid!

Prior to completing the course, I’d have to say that statement fit me pretty well. Now that I’m far more confident in my abilities (while still being well aware of my limitations) I’d say that you could do worse than having me by your side in an emergency.

Michelle Mattox, a CPR/AED/First Aid/O2 Instructor at the Margaret Maddox Family YMCA in Nashville has certified hundreds of people over the years and says that she’s gotten a ton of positive feedback from her students, “It’s more effective when people take an online and in-person class because they get a chance to see it, hear it, and be taught the basics at their own pace and then in the class they can really focus on their skills and getting it right. It’s easier to digest that way. Pretty much everybody that I’ve talked to tells me that they feel more confident and that they know what to do.”

CPR Training is Too Expensive!

Costs may vary from provider to provider, but let me assure you, it’s quite reasonable. I recommend checking out the American Red Cross, the American Heart Association, or your local YMCA for an affordable course near you. Or, to arrange a training for your workplace or organization, call Cardio Partners or AED.com at 866-349-4362 or send an email to customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

Char Vandermeer is a freelance copywriter based in Nashville, TN. When she’s not writing she enjoys reading, gardening, kayaking, and soaking up the sunshine with her family.

10 Reasons Why You Should Learn CPR

The Importance of CPR Training and Certification

If you’re still cooking up your resolutions for the new year, we have a humble suggestion for you: add CPR training to your list. CPR helps keep blood and oxygen flowing and dramatically increases the chances of survival in those who suffer a cardiac arrest.

Here are 10 great reasons why you should learn CPR this year:

Heart Disease is the Leading Cause of Death in the United States

According to the CDC, heart disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S., claiming the lives of more than 600,000 people each year.

CPR Saves Lives

While heart disease is on the rise, CPR can help save lives. According to the American Heart Association, more than 350,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occurred in 2016. Sadly, 88% of people who suffer from a cardiac arrest outside of the hospital die. However, when properly and promptly performed, CPR can dramatically improve person’s chance of survival.  

Anyone Can Learn CPR

Anyone can learn CPR and everyone should. The American Heart Association reports that 70% of Americans feel helpless to act in the event of a cardiac emergency because they either do not know how to effectively administer CPR or their training has lapsed.

The Life You Save May Be That of a Loved One

Did you know that four out of five cardiac arrests occur at home? Not only that, but many victims of sudden cardiac arrest appear healthy and may not have any known heart diseases or risk factors. Performing CPR promptly may save the life of someone you love.

Prevent Brain Death

Brain death occurs four to six minutes after the heart stops breathing. CPR effectively keeps blood flowing and provides oxygen to the brain and other vital organs, giving the victim a better chance for full recovery. Everyday Health reports that If CPR is given within the first two minutes of cardiac arrest, the chances of survival double.

CPR Makes You Smarter

Let’s face it, by the time you complete CPR training, you’ll know something that you didn’t know before you started!

You’ll Feel Confident in the Event of A Cardiac Emergency

CPR classes will equip you with the tools and the confidence you need to transform yourself from the role of bystander to lifesaver. CPR certification will give you the necessary training to make the right decisions in the event of a cardiac emergency.

CPR Classes are Fun

By nature, CPR classes are hands-on and interactive. While there may be some online training involved, course participants will learn how to properly execute chest compressions in a fun and supportive environment.

You’ll Test Your Musical Knowledge

The tempo at which you should give chest compressions lines up nicely with popular musical gems such as the Bee Gees’ “Stayin’ Alive,” “Walk Like an Egyptian” by the Bangles, and “Save a Horse (Ride a Cowboy)” by country duo Big and Rich.

Join the 3 Percent

An online resource for emergency medical services personnel, EMS1, notes that “Although evidence indicates that bystander CPR and AED use can significantly improve survival and outcomes from cardiac arrest, each year less than 3% of the U.S. population receives CPR training, leaving many bystanders unprepared to respond to cardiac arrest.” Become a part of the solution and sign up for a CPR training course today.


Cardio Partners is a trusted nationwide CPR training center
. We offer CPR, First Aid, AED, and bloodborne pathogen training courses in all 50 states in traditional classroom settings and in blended learning courses. To learn more about our courses or to schedule a training, call our team at 866-349-4362 or email Cardio Partners at customerservice@cardiopartners.com. We’d love to hear from you!