Tag Archives: aha

#WearRedandGive: Going Beyond Go Red

National Wear Red Day and Go Red for Women is here! How are you celebrating?

February 1 is here, and at Cardio Partners, we’re putting our mittens on and gearing up for a day of giving and raising awareness about women’s heart health. Here are a few great ways to celebrate National Wear Red Day. We hope you’ll join us!

Share to Social

Embrace the hashtag with open hearts! Follow the American Heart Association (@AmericanHeart) and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (@NHLBI) on Facebook or @american-heart and @nih-nhlbi on Twitter for the latest updates and events.

Snap a #WearingRed selfie and add a few extra hashtags for good measure:

#NationalWearRedDay
#WearRedDay
#WearRedandGive
#HeartMonth
#RedDressCollection
#DíaLucirPrendasRojas
#MesDelCorazón

Educate and Advocate for Heart Disease Prevention

Demand change. Cardiovascular disease is still the leading cause of death in American women, claiming the lives of one in three women. It’s time for a stat change. We covered this back in November with 5 Practical Ways You Can Prevent Heart Disease but we’re proud to join the American Heart Association (AHA) in supporting the following initiatives:

Physical Activity Initiatives

Did you know that only 26% of men, 19% of women and 20% of adolescents report enough activity to meet Federal recommendations?

The American Heart Association recently adopted the 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines, which state that adults should get at least 150 minutes per week of moderate activity or 75 minutes per week of vigorous activity (or a combination of both). So we figure we should, too.

Healthy Eating Initiatives

Yikes! About 45% of U.S. deaths caused by heart disease, stroke, and Type 2 diabetes are the result of poor dietary habits. In layperson’s terms, Americans are gobbling up too much salt, sugar, and animal fats and aren’t consuming enough fruits, vegetables, healthy fats, and whole grains.

Healthy Living Initiatives

Heart health isn’t just exercising and eating right. It’s all that and more. If you smoke, quit. If you haven’t had your annual checkup, make an appointment today. If you haven’t had a good night’s sleep in a while, make some zzzs a priority. If you need to change your relationship with food, take the plunge. If you have no idea what your blood pressure is, check it.

“High blood pressure, or hypertension, is the second leading cause of preventable heart disease and stroke death — second only to smoking. More than 30 percent of cardiovascular events in women are due to hypertension” (AHA).

Heart Strength in Numbers

It’s one thing to make a commitment to yourself to be more active, eat healthily, and lead a healthy lifestyle. It’s an entirely different thing altogether when you enlist friends and loved ones to join you. After all, if you don’t make heart health a priority, who will? A dear friend or family member, that’s who!

Commit to better health by changing behaviors together. Decide whether you’re going to focus on moving more, eating better, or by monitoring and managing your blood pressure. Then, exercise together, eat together, and keep each other accountable. In the nicest, kindest, and most encouraging way possible, of course.

Sign Up for A CPR and AED Certification Course

We know you’re a loyal Cardio Partners blog reader and you caught our post, 5 Heart-SMART Goals for the New Year. In case you missed it, though, here’s a key takeaway: go get your CPR and AED certifications! You just may save the life of someone you love. To find a class near you, check out the American Red Cross or American Heart Association’s websites. Still need some convincing? Check out 10 Reasons Why You Should Learn CPR.

Donate to Go Red For Women

Let’s put an end to cardiovascular disease, the No. 1 killer of women. Make an online donation to the American Heart Association.

Become a Community Heart Hero

Can’t afford a financial donation? Become a heart hero like Texas Girl Scout Jillian Rash and start a fundraiser for a public access AED for your community. To learn more about fundraising for your AED program, download the Cardio Partners Grant Guide.

Let us know how you’re celebrating WearRedDay; we’d love to hear from you! Please contact Cardio Partners at 866-349-4362. We also welcome your emails, and you can reach us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

8 Pool Safety Tips and AED Best Practices for a Safe, Happy, and Healthy Summer!

Why is Pool Safety Important?

As visions of summer vacation dance in the minds of kids, parents, and teachers, it’s time to either start preparing your backyard pool for the flocks of neighborhood children or to renew that expired pool membership!

Before you take that first plunge into the deep end, however, it’s important to take a moment to reflect on the importance of pool safety. According to the Centers for Disease Control, “Drownings are a leading cause of injury death for young children ages 1 to 14, and three children die every day as a result of drowning. In fact, drowning kills more children 1 to 4 than anything else except birth defects.”

In a ten-year period from 2005-2014, there were an average of 3,536 drowning deaths in the United States each year. That’s more than 10 deaths per day!

Here at Cardio Partners and AED.com, we want to make sure that everyone stays safe this glorious summer!

Tip #1: Make Sure Your Poolside Guests Know How to Swim!

May is National Water Safety Month and we think it’s the perfect time to enroll your child in swim lessons. Here’s a statistic we can get behind: the CDC estimates that the risk of drowning is decreased by nearly 90% when young children take swimming lessons. Naturally, grown-ups and teens can benefit from refresher courses, First Aid classes, CPR certification, or lifeguarding classes. Check out your local Parks & Recreation schedule or try a nearby YMCA or Red Cross.

Tip #2: Invest in Personal Flotation Devices and Life Saving Equipment

If you have a pool, you need personal flotation devices and life-saving equipment. We recommend that all non-swimmers wear a U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacket or personal flotation device—even in the shallow end! We agree, those little donut-shaped swimmies and dinosaur floaties are super cute and noodles are tons of fun, but they’re not designed to prevent drowning.

Tip #3: Know the Signs of Drowning and Secondary Drowning

Contrary to every splashy Hollywood movie ever released, a person who is drowning probably won’t wave their hands in the air and cry desperately for help. They’ll be too busy trying to breathe to use that precious oxygen for shouting. More often than not, death by drowning is silent, so keep your eyes and your ears open.

Drowning Warning Signs

If your guest has gone silent and still in the water, check in and ask them to respond verbally. If the person is unable to respond, or their expression is blank, get them out of the water immediately!

Symptoms of Dry (or Secondary) Drowning

Dry drowning, or secondary drowning is also a very real danger. The American Osteopathic Association writes: “Dry and secondary drowning can occur after inhaling water through the nose or mouth. In cases of dry drowning, the water triggers a spasm in the airway, causing it to close up and impact breathing. Unlike dry drowning, delayed or secondary drowning occurs when swimmers have taken water into their lungs. The water builds up over time, eventually causing breathing difficulties.”

Tip # 4: Designate a “Lifeguard”

If you’re hosting a pool party, hiring a lifeguard may seem equal parts excessive and over-cautious, but it may be worth considering. First Aid and poolside CPR-certified lifeguards typically earn $10-15 an hour and are worth every penny in peace of mind. For smaller, family affairs, be sure to select a strong swimmer who is also CPR or First Aid certified as your designated watcher.

Tip #5: Invest in a First Aid Kit and an AED

There’s a reason why so many states have passed AED Legislation mandating the placement of AEDs in schools and sporting facilities. For a victim of Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA), an AED can be a lifesaver. AEDs are designed for use in a variety of adverse conditions.

If you need to use an AED on someone who has been swimming or has recently been pulled from the pool, remove any clothing and dry his or her chest as thoroughly as possible. Be sure there are no puddles around you, the patient, or the AED. Apply the pads and follow the device’s voice prompts. Every AED cautions responders and bystanders to stand clear of the patient.

Tip # 6: Pick a Swim Buddy!

Younger kids should have always have a swim buddy! Make sure your young swimmers can identify their swimming buddy and encourage clear communication. Even with the buddy system in place, never leave children unattended in the pool.

Tip # 7: Safety First!

You should check your local ordinances to make sure that your pool enclosure is in compliance with local regulations. Always securely lock your pool area when you’re not using it. And finally, make sure that you have access to a phone (preferably a water-resistant one) at all times in the case of an emergency.

Tip #8: Jump On In! (Feet-first, of Course!)

Diving headfirst into swimming pool can result in serious injury or death. Teach children how to jump into a pool feet-first and away from the pool’s concrete edge. Cannonballs are encouraged!

Get yourself pool-ready and water-safe. Enroll in a First Aid and AED Certification course today. Call our team at 866-349-4362 or visit AED.com or CardioPartners.com for more information.

Gasping Can Indicate Survival After Cardiac Arrest

According to the AHA, more than 350,000 people experience a non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) every year, averaging to more than 1,000 victims each day*. Among those statistics, only about 10 percent of OHCA victims survive. To combat these odds, however, a quick response with an automatic external defibrillator (AED) and CPR can improve the survival rate of an individual. In addition to the efforts of a rescuer, a recent study suggests gasping for air before or during CPR in an OHCA victim can actually be an indicator of survival with “favorable” brain function.

Gasping, or agonal respiration, is an individual’s natural reflex to allow for oxygen and circulation during CPR. This is said to be a marker for brainstem activity.

Remember, if someone is unresponsive and not breathing OR not breathing normally, start CPR.

According to researcher Guillaume Debaty, MD, this is the first report of its kind to stress the connection of gasping as a predictive factor to long-term survival and favorable brain function. Of those survivors, 37 percent had irregular respiration during CPR. This indicator is seen as a positive, which further solidifies the need for chest compressions during an OHCA on a gasping victim.

Following this study, researchers are recommending an emphasis be placed on identifying abnormal pattern breathing as an early sign of cardiac arrest. One of the authors of the report said it is a person’s natural response “deserving attention.” With this recent information, there is new stress on incorporating the recognition of gasping into CPR training. Researchers highlight the importance of rescuers correctly associating gasping as an indicator of cardiac arrest, rather than normal breathing.

Another goal for attributing gasping to cardiac arrest and survival rates is to help improve the lack of reporting and tracking around the phenomena in order to inform future research.

Are you thinking about CPR training? We hope so. Cardio Partners is a nationwide training center offering traditional classroom courses through the American Red Cross and the American Heart Association. Schedule CPR training by emailing customerservice@cardiopartners.com or by learning more here.

 Source: http://www.cpr.heart.org/AHAECC/CPRAndECC/General/UCM_477263_Cardiac-Arrest-Statistics.jsp

Why We Need AEDs in Schools

 

With school back in full swing again, teachers, coaches and other faculty members must strive to create a safe environment for every child that walks through their doors. Having that responsibility is big, but creating a little piece of mind by implementing automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in schools is even bigger. When we lose nearly 7,000 young people to sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) each year, it’s hard not to concern ourselves with the best way to respond should it strike during school hours. Not every school can afford to have emergency personnel on the premises, so having a life-saving source is key — especially when the AED is designed to walk any rescuer through defibrillation and CPR using voice prompts.

 

Despite the fact SCA can strike at any time in people of all ages and fitness levels, only 17 out of 50 states in the U.S. are required to install AEDs in schools, says an analysis published in the Journal of the American College Cardiology. This seems like an impossible number of states without the requirement for AEDs in schools, especially considering that defibrillation within three minutes of SCA can increase a person’s survival to 70 percent.

 

Often times, SCA occurs in young persons between the ages 10-19 years old; however, it can still strike in children of all ages without warning. According to the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, two-thirds of SCA-related deaths in children happen during exercise or activity. With this in mind, preparation for such a tragic event can start with simple CPR, AED and first training.

 

Knowing that AEDs are crucial to increasing someone’s survival rate, there’s no question as to why they’re needed in schools. So, before investing in an AED at your facility, you first want to be sure it’s affordable, reliable and, most importantly, easy to use. Fortunately, models like the Zoll AED Plus and the HeartSine Samaritan PAD 350P can offer a solution. Both of these affordable, lifesaving devices use voice prompts, which helps guide any rescuer through the resuscitation process. This allows the user to feel confident in their rescuing abilities during a very high stress situation.

Spring into Action: Easy Tips to Avoid Heart Disease

Spring is FINALLY here! Spring means blossoms blooming, bees buzzing, rain raining, thunder thundering, lightning flashing, cool winds blowing, sunrise jogging, playground swinging, barbecuing, families gathering, sunset kissing, lemonade standing, and kids laughing. Spring means starting over, starting fresh and starting anew.

To millions of Americans, spring (and all of its spring-y-ness) is a reminder that they can’t do all of those things anymore because they suffer from heart disease. According to The American Heart Association (AHA), heart disease is the number one cause of death in the United States. Over 800,000 Americans died of heart disease each year. That’s 1 out of every 3 deaths. Think about that the next time you sit down for family dinner. Look to your left and then to your right. One of you will die from heart disease. Those are sobering statistics.

What can we do to avoid becoming a statistic? The AHA lists smoking, physical inactivity, and poor nutrition, among others, as the leading causes of heart disease. A good start is to follow some simple dos and don’ts. Here are a few tips that could save your life:

Have a healthy eating plan: Choose foods low in salt and saturated fat. Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fish and nuts. Try to avoid sugary drinks and red meat. If you’ve got to have that steak, get the filet. It has the lowest amount of fat on the menu. Don’t make your diet goals too big. Set small goals of eating a little better each day and each week. You’ll notice a difference in how you look and feel.

Be physically active: Little bits of exercise each day can go a long way towards avoiding heart disease. The goal is to exercise 60 minutes each day. That’s a lofty target, and most of us just don’t have that kind of time. You can do small things like take the stairs instead of the elevator, or park on the far end of the parking lot instead of right next to the grocery store. You will find yourself feeling stronger in no time.

Tame your stress: Easier said than done, right? The AHA says long term stress can cause increases in heart rate and blood pressure that may damage artery walls. Learning stress management techniques like deep breathing exercises will not only benefit your body, but also your quality of life.

Spring Into Action! And make small choices today that will pay off the rest of your life. Your friends and family will love you for it!

Written by John Bryson, Director of Marketing, DXE Medical Inc.

Maryland Officer Saves 9-Month Old with CPR

9-month old saved by CPR

Kenzlee Mae Cushman, the 9-month-old girl you see in the picture, was saved by Officer James Herman of the Montgomery County Police Department recently. When Kenzlee’s grandparents were driving with her down the highway, they noticed their granddaughter having a seizure, which then lead to her not breathing. Kenzlee’s grandparents pulled over on the side of the road where Officer Herman was nearby writing a motorist ticket. Continue reading Maryland Officer Saves 9-Month Old with CPR

Ever Wonder What An AED Actually Does?

When you ask people what an Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) is, the typical response is usually, “oh, those things to shock people is they have cardiac arrest,” or “ aren’t they those green things I see in white boxes at gym’s and stuff?”  Well of course both of these answers are correct, but what exactly does an AED do? Continue reading Ever Wonder What An AED Actually Does?