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A Step-by-Step Guide to Performing CPR on Your Pet

CPR for Pets

Did you know that a whopping 84.6 million families own a pet (American Pet Products Association)? That’s 68% of all American households! For animal lovers, our pets are part of the family. We love them, we cherish them, and we turn to them for comfort. They bring us joy and they make us laugh.

Although our animals are beloved members of the family, how many of us are prepared to perform life-saving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in the event our furry friend’s heart stops beating?

Pet CPR

Recommendations for CPR in Dogs and Cats

CPR is a combination of chest compression and artificial respiration. It is typically performed when you cannot feel or hear your pet’s heartbeat. Once the animal stops breathing, the heart will go into cardiac arrest and stop beating.

According to American Veterinary Medical Foundation, in 2012, more than 100 veterinary specialists from around the world reviewed scientific papers related to CPR in animals to put together comprehensive guidelines for veterinarians and pet owners. General recommendations include:

  • Perform 100 to 120 chest compressions per minute.
  • Compressions should be performed with the animal lying on its side and should be as deep as one-third to one-half of the chest width.
  • Ventilate intubated dogs and cats at a rate of 10 breaths per minute. For mouth-to-snout ventilation, maintain a compression-to-artificial respiration ratio of 30-2.
  • Perform CPR in 2-minute cycles. If possible, switch the person performing the compressions with each cycle.
  • In a medical setting, administer vasopressors every 3 to 5 minutes during CPR.

A free special issue of the Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care covers the development of the guidelines as well a detailed evidence analysis.

How to Perform Artificial Respiration and CPR on Your Pet

First, check for a heartbeat by watching for the rise or fall of the chest, feel for breath using your hand, or check the gums — they will turn blue from lack of oxygen. Make sure the animal’s airway is clear and free from obstructions.

At this point, it’s important to note that performing CPR on an animal that is healthy and has a heartbeat can cause physical complications and may even be fatal. If your pet’s chest is not moving and you cannot detect a heartbeat, begin CPR with chest compressions immediately.

Next, prepare to begin chest compressions. The American Red Cross recommends placing your hands on your pet as follows:

    • For cats, small dogs and puppies, place the heel of one of your hands directly over the pet’s heart and place your other hand on top of the first hand.
    • For deep-chested dogs, place the heel of one hand over the widest part of the chest and place your other hand directly over the first hand.
    • For barrel chested dogs, place the dog on its back, place one hand over the widest part of the sternum, and place your other hand on top of the first hand. Lock your elbows and make sure your shoulders are directly above your hands.

Once your hands are in place, push hard and fast at a rate of 100-120 compressions per minute, again compressing one-third to one-half the width of your pet’s chest. Make sure that the animal’s chest returns to its normal position before compressing again to ensure oxygen is entering the body.

After you’ve performed 30 chest compressions, begin giving rescue breaths. “To give rescue breaths, gently close the pet’s mouth and extend the pet’s neck to open the airway. Cover your pet’s nose with your mouth and exhale until you see the pet’s chest rise. Give a second rescue breath” (American Red Cross).

Continue giving CPR with a cycle of 30 chest compressions and two rescue breaths until your pet begins breathing. Check for breathing and a heartbeat every two minutes.

To learn more about animal first aid or to complete an online cat and dog first aid training, visit redcross.org.

For more information on the importance of CPR for humans, read our post, 10 Reasons Why You Should Learn CPR. Cardio Partners and AED.com offers CPR, First Aid, AED, and bloodborne pathogen training courses in all 50 states in traditional classroom settings and in blended learning courses. To learn more about our courses or to schedule a training, call our team at 866-349-4362 or email us

at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

10 Reasons Why You Should Learn CPR

The Importance of CPR Training and Certification

If you’re still cooking up your resolutions for the new year, we have a humble suggestion for you: add CPR training to your list. CPR helps keep blood and oxygen flowing and dramatically increases the chances of survival in those who suffer a cardiac arrest.

Here are 10 great reasons why you should learn CPR this year:

Heart Disease is the Leading Cause of Death in the United States

According to the CDC, heart disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S., claiming the lives of more than 600,000 people each year.

CPR Saves Lives

While heart disease is on the rise, CPR can help save lives. According to the American Heart Association, more than 350,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occurred in 2016. Sadly, 88% of people who suffer from a cardiac arrest outside of the hospital die. However, when properly and promptly performed, CPR can dramatically improve person’s chance of survival.  

Anyone Can Learn CPR

Anyone can learn CPR and everyone should. The American Heart Association reports that 70% of Americans feel helpless to act in the event of a cardiac emergency because they either do not know how to effectively administer CPR or their training has lapsed.

The Life You Save May Be That of a Loved One

Did you know that four out of five cardiac arrests occur at home? Not only that, but many victims of sudden cardiac arrest appear healthy and may not have any known heart diseases or risk factors. Performing CPR promptly may save the life of someone you love.

Prevent Brain Death

Brain death occurs four to six minutes after the heart stops breathing. CPR effectively keeps blood flowing and provides oxygen to the brain and other vital organs, giving the victim a better chance for full recovery. Everyday Health reports that If CPR is given within the first two minutes of cardiac arrest, the chances of survival double.

CPR Makes You Smarter

Let’s face it, by the time you complete CPR training, you’ll know something that you didn’t know before you started!

You’ll Feel Confident in the Event of A Cardiac Emergency

CPR classes will equip you with the tools and the confidence you need to transform yourself from the role of bystander to lifesaver. CPR certification will give you the necessary training to make the right decisions in the event of a cardiac emergency.

CPR Classes are Fun

By nature, CPR classes are hands-on and interactive. While there may be some online training involved, course participants will learn how to properly execute chest compressions in a fun and supportive environment.

You’ll Test Your Musical Knowledge

The tempo at which you should give chest compressions lines up nicely with popular musical gems such as the Bee Gees’ “Stayin’ Alive,” “Walk Like an Egyptian” by the Bangles, and “Save a Horse (Ride a Cowboy)” by country duo Big and Rich.

Join the 3 Percent

An online resource for emergency medical services personnel, EMS1, notes that “Although evidence indicates that bystander CPR and AED use can significantly improve survival and outcomes from cardiac arrest, each year less than 3% of the U.S. population receives CPR training, leaving many bystanders unprepared to respond to cardiac arrest.” Become a part of the solution and sign up for a CPR training course today.


Cardio Partners is a trusted nationwide CPR training center
. We offer CPR, First Aid, AED, and bloodborne pathogen training courses in all 50 states in traditional classroom settings and in blended learning courses. To learn more about our courses or to schedule a training, call our team at 866-349-4362 or email Cardio Partners at customerservice@cardiopartners.com. We’d love to hear from you!

Gasping Can Indicate Survival After Cardiac Arrest

According to the AHA, more than 350,000 people experience a non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) every year, averaging to more than 1,000 victims each day*. Among those statistics, only about 10 percent of OHCA victims survive. To combat these odds, however, a quick response with an automatic external defibrillator (AED) and CPR can improve the survival rate of an individual. In addition to the efforts of a rescuer, a recent study suggests gasping for air before or during CPR in an OHCA victim can actually be an indicator of survival with “favorable” brain function.

Gasping, or agonal respiration, is an individual’s natural reflex to allow for oxygen and circulation during CPR. This is said to be a marker for brainstem activity.

Remember, if someone is unresponsive and not breathing OR not breathing normally, start CPR.

According to researcher Guillaume Debaty, MD, this is the first report of its kind to stress the connection of gasping as a predictive factor to long-term survival and favorable brain function. Of those survivors, 37 percent had irregular respiration during CPR. This indicator is seen as a positive, which further solidifies the need for chest compressions during an OHCA on a gasping victim.

Following this study, researchers are recommending an emphasis be placed on identifying abnormal pattern breathing as an early sign of cardiac arrest. One of the authors of the report said it is a person’s natural response “deserving attention.” With this recent information, there is new stress on incorporating the recognition of gasping into CPR training. Researchers highlight the importance of rescuers correctly associating gasping as an indicator of cardiac arrest, rather than normal breathing.

Another goal for attributing gasping to cardiac arrest and survival rates is to help improve the lack of reporting and tracking around the phenomena in order to inform future research.

Are you thinking about CPR training? We hope so. Cardio Partners is a nationwide training center offering traditional classroom courses through the American Red Cross and the American Heart Association. Schedule CPR training by emailing customerservice@cardiopartners.com or by learning more here.

 Source: http://www.cpr.heart.org/AHAECC/CPRAndECC/General/UCM_477263_Cardiac-Arrest-Statistics.jsp

Why We Need AEDs in Schools

 

With school back in full swing again, teachers, coaches and other faculty members must strive to create a safe environment for every child that walks through their doors. Having that responsibility is big, but creating a little piece of mind by implementing automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in schools is even bigger. When we lose nearly 7,000 young people to sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) each year, it’s hard not to concern ourselves with the best way to respond should it strike during school hours. Not every school can afford to have emergency personnel on the premises, so having a life-saving source is key — especially when the AED is designed to walk any rescuer through defibrillation and CPR using voice prompts.

 

Despite the fact SCA can strike at any time in people of all ages and fitness levels, only 17 out of 50 states in the U.S. are required to install AEDs in schools, says an analysis published in the Journal of the American College Cardiology. This seems like an impossible number of states without the requirement for AEDs in schools, especially considering that defibrillation within three minutes of SCA can increase a person’s survival to 70 percent.

 

Often times, SCA occurs in young persons between the ages 10-19 years old; however, it can still strike in children of all ages without warning. According to the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, two-thirds of SCA-related deaths in children happen during exercise or activity. With this in mind, preparation for such a tragic event can start with simple CPR, AED and first training.

 

Knowing that AEDs are crucial to increasing someone’s survival rate, there’s no question as to why they’re needed in schools. So, before investing in an AED at your facility, you first want to be sure it’s affordable, reliable and, most importantly, easy to use. Fortunately, models like the Zoll AED Plus and the HeartSine Samaritan PAD 350P can offer a solution. Both of these affordable, lifesaving devices use voice prompts, which helps guide any rescuer through the resuscitation process. This allows the user to feel confident in their rescuing abilities during a very high stress situation.

Spring into Action: Easy Tips to Avoid Heart Disease

Spring is FINALLY here! Spring means blossoms blooming, bees buzzing, rain raining, thunder thundering, lightning flashing, cool winds blowing, sunrise jogging, playground swinging, barbecuing, families gathering, sunset kissing, lemonade standing, and kids laughing. Spring means starting over, starting fresh and starting anew.

To millions of Americans, spring (and all of its spring-y-ness) is a reminder that they can’t do all of those things anymore because they suffer from heart disease. According to The American Heart Association (AHA), heart disease is the number one cause of death in the United States. Over 800,000 Americans died of heart disease each year. That’s 1 out of every 3 deaths. Think about that the next time you sit down for family dinner. Look to your left and then to your right. One of you will die from heart disease. Those are sobering statistics.

What can we do to avoid becoming a statistic? The AHA lists smoking, physical inactivity, and poor nutrition, among others, as the leading causes of heart disease. A good start is to follow some simple dos and don’ts. Here are a few tips that could save your life:

Have a healthy eating plan: Choose foods low in salt and saturated fat. Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fish and nuts. Try to avoid sugary drinks and red meat. If you’ve got to have that steak, get the filet. It has the lowest amount of fat on the menu. Don’t make your diet goals too big. Set small goals of eating a little better each day and each week. You’ll notice a difference in how you look and feel.

Be physically active: Little bits of exercise each day can go a long way towards avoiding heart disease. The goal is to exercise 60 minutes each day. That’s a lofty target, and most of us just don’t have that kind of time. You can do small things like take the stairs instead of the elevator, or park on the far end of the parking lot instead of right next to the grocery store. You will find yourself feeling stronger in no time.

Tame your stress: Easier said than done, right? The AHA says long term stress can cause increases in heart rate and blood pressure that may damage artery walls. Learning stress management techniques like deep breathing exercises will not only benefit your body, but also your quality of life.

Spring Into Action! And make small choices today that will pay off the rest of your life. Your friends and family will love you for it!

Written by John Bryson, Director of Marketing, DXE Medical Inc.

Maryland Officer Saves 9-Month Old with CPR

9-month old saved by CPR

Kenzlee Mae Cushman, the 9-month-old girl you see in the picture, was saved by Officer James Herman of the Montgomery County Police Department recently. When Kenzlee’s grandparents were driving with her down the highway, they noticed their granddaughter having a seizure, which then lead to her not breathing. Kenzlee’s grandparents pulled over on the side of the road where Officer Herman was nearby writing a motorist ticket. Continue reading Maryland Officer Saves 9-Month Old with CPR

National Walking Day – Wednesday April 1st

National Walking Day

Around 80% of adults do not get enough regular physical activity to maintain good health, which leads to increased risk of heart disease, chronic fatigue and poorer quality of life.

On National Walking Day, Americans are encouraged to lace up their sneakers and take 30 minutes out of their day to get up and walk. Walking is one of the easiest and cheapest activities you can do to improve your quality of life. Continue reading National Walking Day – Wednesday April 1st