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Regional Efforts for AED Placement

AED Placement

According to Live 5 News out of Charleston, SC, emergency responders have been mapping out the placement of AED’s in the Lowcountry for a couple of years now. EMS Chief Carl Fehr says they created an AED database to make it easier when someone calls 911. Dispatchers will talk lay responders through the process of doing CPR and also let them know where they can find an AED.

Over 500 devices have been registered. however, they believe there are several that still need to be accounted for in the community. Businesses have access to register their AEDs in a database so when someone calls from that location, the dispatcher can see where the AED is placed within the building.

Back in December of 2016, Tony Butler and his teammates were playing basketball at the Mt. Pleasant town hall gym. Butler’s medical checkups have always been good, his blood pressure normal. Yet, as he puts it, “it happened.”

Butler had just wrapped up one game, and the guys playing the next court over convinced him to stay and join in.

“I was there about 5 minutes and didn’t feel right,” said Butler. “So I went and sat on the bench. And they tell me I slid onto the floor and was… was gone.”

His heart stopped. One player called 911. Someone else ran to the police station next door.

“And one of them went to the office and got the AED,” said Butler. Luckily, firefighters were at the gym by that point and could use the AED quickly. “They zapped me two or three times. The next thing I remember is being in the ambulance. Going across the bridge.”

Butler survived. He is still sore from his ribs being broken during chest compressions. He’s working on building up his basketball stamina again.

The goal is for people who witness a cardiac emergency to think not only to call 911, but to also think to grab an AED. While training helps with a rescuer’s comfort level, you don’t have to be trained.

Anyone can use an AED.

You do have to know where it is, which is why the regional registration database is so useful for someone calling 911.

“I think every business should have one,” Butler said about AEDs.

Source: live5news.com

April is Stress Awareness Month!

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The American Heart Institute of Stress has reported that 90% of visits to primary care physicians are stress related disorders. Commonly ranging from stomach issues to heart disease. Did you know that job related stress costs businesses about $150 billion a year? It is important to pay attention to how you deal with minor and major stress events so that you know when to seek help.

People feel stress in different ways. Some people experience digestive symptoms, while others have headaches, sadness, insomnia, and irritability. Over time, these symptoms may contribute to major health concerns such as heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and depression.

Here are five tips to help manage stress:

• Be mindful of the signs – sleeplessness, low energy and feeling irritable are some signs that you need to take a break from the stressor. Give yourself permission to recharge by doing something else. What’s stressing you out may not go away but allowing yourself 20 minutes to get fresh air, take deep breaths, and meditate, can help you feel less overwhelmed and may give you a new perspective.

• Exercise – moving your body can have some direct stress relieving benefits. Studies show that regular physical activity produce endorphins in the brain that act as natural painkillers – which in turn reduces stress. A twenty minute walk during a stressful time can have immediate effect that can last several hours.

• Laugh – laughter provides a physical and emotional release which in turn increases endorphins. A good belly laugh to the point of happy tears is also a great internal workout which provides a good workout for the heart and diaphragm. Laughter also connects us with others, just as smiling and kindness do.

• Stay connected and socialize – Reach out to a friend and share your concerns. It may help to relieve stress but remember it’s important that the person whom you talk is trustworthy. Socialization, or enjoying other people’s company and maintaining a sense of connectedness to others, is an important component of stress reduction.

• Set goals and prioritize – choose what must get done and what can wait, and learn to say no to new tasks if they are putting you into overload. Recognize what you have accomplished at the end of the day, not what you have been unable to do. Be sure to plan for setbacks and think about how you can plan ahead for how to deal with them if they happen.

Our bodies were designed to cope with acute stress, not the chronic stress we face daily in the workplace or at home. Chronic stress can lead to deteriorating overall health. It’s important to recognize what triggers stress and learn tools that can help you cope.

source: stress.org, apa.org

 

Don’t Press Your Luck by Waiting – Be A Lifesaver!

Give CPR and Use an AED
You witness a co-worker suddenly collapse and they are unresponsive.
What is your course of action?
Most people believe that the best thing you can do is call 911 and wait for medical professionals to arrive. Unfortunately, victims of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) have a less than 10% chance of survival on average in the United States.

The first step in any emergency situation is always to call 911, but to give your co-worker, friend, or loved one the best chance of survival—you should immediately begin CPR and use an AED.

As each minute passes, the SCA victim is 10% less likely to survive without CPR or defibrillation with an AED. Average EMS response time in many metro areas is 7-12 minutes, with rural areas taking much longer. Simply put, waiting for EMS to arrive can be detrimental to the victim.

The heart’s dangerous rhythm during cardiac arrest can only be reversed with defibrillation. Using an AED, a lifesaving tool designed for ANYONE to operate, provides defibrillation therapy. AEDs will analyze the patient and ONLY provide a shock if the person needs one. You CANNOT accidentally shock a person using an AED.

 

Already have AEDs available in your organization or workplace?

Remember, don’t press your luck by ignoring the AED. Implement an AED Management Program so your team is always rescue ready!

• Assign someone to be in charge of maintaining your AED(s)

• Train designated responders at your facility who can confidently respond with highly-effective CPR and quick use of the AED

• Place AEDs in accessible locations with the ability to retrieve an AED and return to patient within 90 seconds

• Make sure the battery and electrode pads are checked regularly (Battery failure is the #1 cause of AEDs not working properly during a rescue)

• Replace expired pads or dead batteries promptly


Shop popular items: New AEDs — Recertified AEDs — CPR Pocket Mask — Pads — Batteries

Learn more about RescueTrac AED Program Management

Call 855-233-0266 to speak with an AED Specialist today!

DXE Medical is on a Mission… to Save More Lives

Building pic with logo

 

I would like to take a few moments to discuss the tremendous mission the team at DXE Medical has joined with our partners and Customers over the past 18 years. If anyone were to ask “Why does it matter?” our team is ready to say,

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Surviving Cardiac Arrest Depends On Where You Are

survivability-blog

Earlier this year, Diane Robinson, a minister on staff at St. James United Church reflected on how valuable the AED at her church was last Christmas Eve when it saved her own life during cardiac arrest. Robinson said the AED had been installed two months prior to the device being deployed for the first time, on her. A church coworker, Rev. Laura Sundberg, was able to apply the AED and perform CPR with a 911 operator’s assistance. Nearly 8.5 minutes later, the paramedics arrived to take over with advanced care.

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Immediately performing CPR is crucial. This is why.

Why CPR is Crucial Blog

You watch CPR being performed on TV shows, we hear about a police officer saving an individual with CPR on the news and now many U.S. states are requiring CPR to be taught to high school students.

While many people say they have been trained in CPR at some point in their life, most do not understand what CPR is actually doing and just how important performing high-quality chest compressions and providing rescue breaths really is.

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AED.com Gives Away Four New AEDs!

Zoll AED Plus

We did it again! AED.com and DXE Medical partnered with ZOLL Medical to giveaway FOUR more AEDs during Sudden Cardiac Arrest Month, October. Here is a little about each of our winners:

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