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Florida - AED Statutes & Regulations

AED owners are legally responsible to ensure compliance and emergency readiness of their AEDs. Each unit must meet certain requirements from the FDA, the local state, and individual AED manufacturers, which can be a challenging task to maintain. Thousands of customers rely on us to manage their AED compliance through our easy to use tool called LifeShield. Learn more about how we support our clients with an unmatched AED compliance program offering here.


Florida Summary
RequirementSummary
AED TrainingAED users are encouraged to obtain training and register with local EMS.
BusinessesBusiness entities are encouraged to obtain and AED, but there is no requirement to do so.
SchoolsEach public school that is a member of the Florida High School Athletic Association must have an operation AED on the school grounds. School employees or volunteers who are reasonably expected to use the AED must be trained in CPR/AED. School AEDs must be registered with a local EMS provider.
Dentist OfficesAEDs are required in dental offices.
Assisted LivingAEDs are required in certain assisted living facilities.
State ParksEach state park is encouraged to have on the premises at all times a functioning AED. State park employees should receive AED training.
CPR/First Aid TrainingCPR/First Aid Training is encouraged for students starting in grade 6 and every two years after, and must be based on a nationally recognized program.
Florida Statutes and Regulations
StatuteAbstract
Florida Statutes - 401.2915 Automated external defibrillator.

It is the intent of the Legislature that an automated external defibrillator may be used by any person for the purpose of saving the life of another person in cardiac arrest. In order to achieve that goal, the Legislature intends to encourage training in lifesaving first aid and set standards for and encourage the use of automated external defibrillators.
(1) As used in this section, the term:
(a) Automated external defibrillator means a device as defined in s. 768.1325(2)(b).
(b) Defibrillation means the administration of a controlled electrical charge to the heart to restore a viable cardiac rhythm.

(2) In order to promote public health and safety:
(a) All persons who use an automated external defibrillator are encouraged to obtain appropriate training, to include completion of a course in cardiopulmonary resuscitation or successful completion of a basic first aid course that includes cardiopulmonary resuscitation training, and demonstrated proficiency in the use of an automated external defibrillator.
(b) Any person or entity in possession of an automated external defibrillator is encouraged to notify the local emergency medical services medical director or the local public safety answering point, as defined in s. 365.172(3), of the location of the automated external defibrillator.
(c) Any person who uses an automated external defibrillator shall activate the emergency medical services system as soon as possible upon use of the automated external defibrillator.

(3) Any person who intentionally or willfully:
(a) Tampers with or otherwise renders an automated external defibrillator inoperative, except during such time as the automated external defibrillator is being serviced, tested, repaired, recharged, or inspected or except pursuant to court order; or
(b) Obliterates the serial number on an automated external defibrillator for purposes of falsifying service records, commits a misdemeanor of the first degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083. Paragraph (a) does not apply to the owner of the automated external defibrillator or the owner’s authorized representative or agent.

(4) Each local and state law enforcement vehicle may carry an automated external defibrillator.
Florida Statutes - 768.1325 Cardiac Arrest Survival Act; immunity from civil liability.

(1) This section may be cited as the Cardiac Arrest Survival Act.

(2) As used in this section:
(a) Perceived medical emergency means circumstances in which the behavior of an individual leads a reasonable person to believe that the individual is experiencing a life-threatening medical condition that requires an immediate medical response regarding the heart or other cardiopulmonary functioning of the individual.
(b) Automated external defibrillator device means a lifesaving defibrillator device that:

1. Is commercially distributed in accordance with the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

2. Is capable of recognizing the presence or absence of ventricular fibrillation, and is capable of determining without intervention by the user of the device whether defibrillation should be performed.

3. Upon determining that defibrillation should be performed, is able to deliver an electrical shock to an individual.
(c) Harm means damage or loss of any and all types, including, but not limited to, physical, nonphysical, economic, noneconomic, actual, compensatory, consequential, incidental, and punitive damages or losses.

(3) Notwithstanding any other provision of law to the contrary, and except as provided in subsection (4), any person who uses or attempts to use an automated external defibrillator device on a victim of a perceived medical emergency, without objection of the victim of the perceived medical emergency, is immune from civil liability for any harm resulting from the use or attempted use of such device. In addition, notwithstanding any other provision of law to the contrary, and except as provided in subsection (4), any person who acquired the device and makes it available for use, including, but not limited to, a community association organized under chapter 617, chapter 718, chapter 719, chapter 720, chapter 721, or chapter 723, is immune from such liability, if the harm was not due to the failure of such person to:
(a) Properly maintain and test the device; or
(b) Provide appropriate training in the use of the device to an employee or agent of the acquirer when the employee or agent was the person who used the device on the victim, except that such requirement of training does not apply if:

1. The device is equipped with audible, visual, or written instructions on its use, including any such visual or written instructions posted on or adjacent to the device;

2. The employee or agent was not an employee or agent who would have been reasonably expected to use the device; or

3. The period of time elapsing between the engagement of the person as an employee or agent and the occurrence of the harm, or between the acquisition of the device and the occurrence of the harm in any case in which the device was acquired after engagement of the employee or agent, was not a reasonably sufficient period in which to provide the training.

(4) Immunity under subsection (3) does not apply to a person if:
(a) The harm involved was caused by that person’s willful or criminal misconduct, gross negligence, reckless disregard or misconduct, or a conscious, flagrant indifference to the rights or safety of the victim who was harmed;
(b) The person is a licensed or certified health professional who used the automated external defibrillator device while acting within the scope of the license or certification of the professional and within the scope of the employment or agency of the professional;
(c) The person is a hospital, clinic, or other entity whose primary purpose is providing health care directly to patients, and the harm was caused by an employee or agent of the entity who used the device while acting within the scope of the employment or agency of the employee or agent;
(d) The person is an acquirer of the device who leased the device to a health care entity, or who otherwise provided the device to such entity for compensation without selling the device to the entity, and the harm was caused by an employee or agent of the entity who used the device while acting within the scope of the employment or agency of the employee or agent; or
(e) The person is the manufacturer of the device.

(5) This section does not establish any cause of action. This section does not require that an automated external defibrillator device be placed at any building or other location or require an acquirer to make available on its premises one or more employees or agents trained in the use of the device.

(6) An insurer may not require an acquirer of an automated external defibrillator device which is a community association organized under chapter 617, chapter 718, chapter 719, chapter 720, chapter 721, or chapter 723 to purchase medical malpractice liability coverage as a condition of issuing any other coverage carried by the association, and an insurer may not exclude damages resulting from the use of an automated external defibrillator device from coverage under a general liability policy issued to an association.
Florida Statutes - 768.1326 Placement of automated external defibrillators in state buildings; rulemaking authority.

No later than January 1, 2003, the State Surgeon General shall adopt rules to establish guidelines on the appropriate placement of automated external defibrillator devices in buildings or portions of buildings owned or leased by the state, and shall establish, by rule, recommendations on procedures for the deployment of automated external defibrillator devices in such buildings in accordance with the guidelines. The Secretary of Management Services shall assist the State Surgeon General in the development of the guidelines. The guidelines for the placement of the automated external defibrillators shall take into account the typical number of employees and visitors in the buildings, the extent of the need for security measures regarding the buildings, special circumstances in buildings or portions of buildings such as high electrical voltages or extreme heat or cold, and such other factors as the State Surgeon General and Secretary of Management Services determine to be appropriate. The State Surgeon General’s recommendations for deployment of automated external defibrillators in buildings or portions of buildings owned or leased by the state shall include:

(1) A reference list of appropriate training courses in the use of such devices, including the role of cardiopulmonary resuscitation;

(2) The extent to which such devices may be used by laypersons;

(3) Manufacturer recommended maintenance and testing of the devices; and

(4) Coordination with local emergency medical services systems regarding the incidents of use of the devices.

In formulating these guidelines and recommendations, the State Surgeon General may consult with all appropriate public and private entities, including national and local public health organizations that seek to improve the survival rates of individuals who experience cardiac arrest.
Florida Statutes - 258.0165 Defibrillators in state parks.

(1) Each state park is encouraged to have on the premises at all times a functioning automated external defibrillator.

(2) State parks that provide automated external defibrillators shall ensure that employees and volunteers are properly trained in accordance with s. 401.2915.

(3) The location of each automated external defibrillator shall be registered with a local emergency medical services medical director.

(4) The use of automated external defibrillators by employees and volunteers shall be covered under the provisions of ss. 768.13 and 768.1325.
Florida Statutes - 1006.165 Automated external defibrillator; user training.

(1) Each public school that is a member of the Florida High School Athletic Association must have an operational automated external defibrillator on the school grounds. Public and private partnerships are encouraged to cover the cost associated with the purchase and placement of the defibrillator and training in the use of the defibrillator.

(2) Each school must ensure that all employees or volunteers who are reasonably expected to use the device obtain appropriate training, including completion of a course in cardiopulmonary resuscitation or a basic first aid course that includes cardiopulmonary resuscitation training, and demonstrated proficiency in the use of an automated external defibrillator.

(3) The location of each automated external defibrillator must be registered with a local emergency medical services medical director.

(4) The use of automated external defibrillators by employees and volunteers is covered under ss. 768.13 and 768.1325.
Florida Statutes - 1003.453 School wellness and physical education policies; nutrition guidelines

3) School districts are encouraged to provide basic training in first aid, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation, for all students, beginning in grade 6 and every 2 years thereafter. Instruction in the use of cardiopulmonary resuscitation must be based on a nationally recognized program that uses the most current evidence-based emergency cardiovascular care guidelines. The instruction must allow students to practice the psychomotor skills associated with performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use an automated external defibrillator when a school district has the equipment necessary to perform the instruction. Private and public partnerships for providing training or necessary funding are encouraged.
Florida Statutes - 429.255 Assisted Living

(3)(a)An assisted living facility licensed under this part with 17 or more beds shall have on the premises at all times a functioning automated external defibrillator as defined in s. 768.1325(2)(b).

(b)The facility is encouraged to register the location of each automated external defibrillator with a local emergency medical services medical director.

(c)The provisions of ss. 768.13 and 768.1325 apply to automated external defibrillators within the facility.
Florida Administrative Code - 64J-1.023. Guidelines for Automated External Defibrillators (AED) in State Owned or Leased Facilities.

(1) Management of any state owned or leased facilities considering the placement of AEDs should seek cooperation of facility personnel and local training, medical, and emergency response resources.

(2) An AED is obtained by a prescription from a licensed physician. The prescription must accompany the order for the AED.

(3) Several elements should be considered to determine the appropriate number, placement, and access system for AEDs. Facility managers should consider:

(a) Physician oversight provided by either a facility’s medical staff or contracted through a designated physician. A physician should be involved as a consultant in all aspects of the program.

(b) Response Time: The optimal response time is three minutes or less. This interval begins from the moment a person is identified as needing emergency care to when the AED is at the side of the victim. Survival rates decrease by seven to 10 percent for every minute that defibrillation is delayed.

(c) Lay Responder or Rescuer Training.

1. Pursuant to Section 401.2915(1), F.S., all persons who use an AED shall have the required training.

2. Overall effectiveness of AEDs shall be improved as the number of trained personnel increases. Where possible, facility managers should establish in-house training programs on a routine basis.

3. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and AED training can be obtained from a nationally recognized organization.

4. In addition to training on use of the AED, it is important for lay responders or rescuers to be trained on the maintenance and operation of the specific AED model in the facility.

5. Training is not a one-time event and formal refresher training should be conducted at least every two years. Computer-based programs and video teaching materials permit more frequent review. Facility management should make periodic contact with a training entity to assure that advances in techniques and care are incorporated into their program. In addition to formal annual recertification, mock drills and practice sessions are important to maintain current knowledge and a reasonable comfort level by lay responders or rescuers. The intervals for conducting these exercises should be established in consultation with the physician providing medical oversight.

(d) Demographics of the Facility’s Workforce: Management should examine the make-up of the resident workforce and consider the age profile of workers. Facilities hosting large numbers of visitors are more likely to experience an event, and an appraisal of the demographics of visitors should be included in an assessment. Facilities where strenuous work is conducted are more likely to experience an event. Specialty areas within facilities such as exercise and work out rooms should be considered to have a higher risk of an event than areas where there is minimal physical activity.

(e) Physical Layout of Facility: Response time should be calculated based upon how long it will take for a lay responder or rescuer with an AED and walking at a rapid pace to reach a victim. Large facilities and buildings with unusual designs, elevators, campuses with several separate buildings, and physical impediments all present unique challenges. In some larger facilities, it may be necessary to incorporate the use of properly equipped golf cart style conveyances to accommodate time and distance conditions.

(f) Suggestions for proper placement of AEDs:

1. A secure location that prevents or minimizes the potential for tampering, theft, and/or misuse, and precludes access by unauthorized users.

2. An easily accessible position (e.g., placed at a height so those shorter individuals can reach and remove, unobstructed access).

3. A location that is well marked, publicized, and known among trained staff. Periodic tours of locations are recommended.

4. A nearby telephone that can be used to call backup, security, or 911.

5. Written protocols addressing procedures for activating the local emergency medical services system. These protocols should include notification of EMS personnel of the quantity, brands, and locations of AEDs within the facility.

6. Equipment stored in a manner whereby the removal of the AED automatically notifies security, EMS, or a central control center. If such automatic notification is not possible, emphasis should be placed on notification procedures and equipment placement in close proximity to a telephone.

(g) It is recommended that additional items necessary for a successful rescue be placed in a bag and be stored with the AED. Following are items that may be necessary for successful utilization of the AED:

1. Simplified directions for CPR and use of the AED.

2. Non-latex protective gloves.

3. Appropriate sizes of CPR face masks with detachable mouthpieces, plastic or silicone face shields, one way valves, or other type of barrier device that can be used in mouth to mouth resuscitation.

4. Pair of medium sized bandages.

5. Spare battery and electrode pads.

6. Two biohazard or medical waste plastic bags.

7. Pad of paper and pen for writing.

8. Absorbent towel.
Florida Administrative Code - 64B5-17.015 Office Safety Requirement.

As part of the minimum standard of care, every dental office location shall be required to have an automatic external defibrillator by February 28, 2006. Any dentist practicing after February 28, 2006, without an automatic external defibrillator on site shall be considered to be practicing below the minimum standard of care.

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